J-Boys: Kazuo's World, Tokyo, 1965

J Boys Kazuo s World Tokyo Kazuo Nakamoto s life in inner city Tokyo is one of tea and tofu of American TV and rock n roll Kazuo is nine It is the mid s just after the Japan Olympics and Kazuo dreams of being a track sta

  • Title: J-Boys: Kazuo's World, Tokyo, 1965
  • Author: Shogo Oketani Avery Fischer Udagawa
  • ISBN: 9781933330921
  • Page: 302
  • Format: Paperback
  • Kazuo Nakamoto s life in inner city Tokyo is one of tea and tofu, of American TV and rock n roll Kazuo is nine It is the mid 1960s, just after the Japan Olympics, and Kazuo dreams of being a track star He hangs out with his buddies, goes to school, and helps with household chores But Kazuo s world is changing This bittersweet novel is a deft portrait of a year in aKazuo Nakamoto s life in inner city Tokyo is one of tea and tofu, of American TV and rock n roll Kazuo is nine It is the mid 1960s, just after the Japan Olympics, and Kazuo dreams of being a track star He hangs out with his buddies, goes to school, and helps with household chores But Kazuo s world is changing This bittersweet novel is a deft portrait of a year in a boy s life in a land and time far away, filled with universal concerns about fitting in, escaping the past in this case World War II s lingering devastation , and growing up.J Boys author Shogo Oketani is a writer and novelist who grew up in Tokyo in the mid 1960s.

    610 Comment

    • Dani says:

      J-Boys is a semi-autobiographical (though really historical fiction) look at life in Tokyo in the mid-1960s. Though aimed at a younger audience, I thoroughly enjoyed reading it and was captivated from beginning to end. The characters feel fleshed out and lovable, and it was fun to enjoy their adventures through my own lenses of Japan in the late 2000s and growing up in the US in the early 1990s, both times that this book made me feel nostalgic for.For its intended readership, this book is great. [...]

    • Alana says:

      The book starts out telling us about Kazuo, a young boy who dreams of running as fast as Bob Hayes. His family lives in the Nihon Optics company housing, and although Kazuo feels fortunate enough to live there, his brother, Yasuo, wants to move so he can have a yard for a dog. Kazuo lives a humble life in Tokyo, but throughout his story ( a year in his life, during the start of quite a change in Tokyo) he idealizes the classic middle-class American dream, post WWII. He has a few good friends, wh [...]

    • Christina says:

      J-Boys is a sweet look at one boy's experiences growing up in Tokyo. It takes place during one year, when he is nine, as he goes to school and plays with his best friends, who nickname themselves the "J-Boys". Kazuo tells of shopping for tofu in his neighborhood, playing in the empty lot, and how people's lives were still affected every day by the suffering of World War II (from his mother's memories of a fire bombing she barely survived, and being thrifty because "in the war we had nothing", to [...]

    • Tamara says:

      I won J-Boys through a Good Reads Giveaway and want to make it clear that my review is not biased because I won the book.I am a huge fan of all things Japanese and was very excited to have the opportunity to read this book. It is a quick read and a very interesting one too. The story is a translation and is one that tells what it was like to grow up in Tokyo circa 1956. Kazuo, is the main character of the novel, his Mom has a very tragic view of her past life during wartime Japan 20 years before [...]

    • Owen says:

      In compliance with FTC guidelines, I disclose that I received the book for free through First Reads.I am very interested in the study of differences of other cultures, so I've read a lot of books like this, but the perspective of a child in 1960s Japan is pretty unique. Given that the major theme of this book seems to be the changing cultural mores in the country at the time, a schoolboy is the perfect device through which to show the loss of the old and the inevitable march of the new. The aut [...]

    • April says:

      J-boys: Kazuo's world, Tokyo, 1965Shogo OketaniTranslated by Avery Fischer UdagawaStone Bridge Press2011An Early Reviewers book.J-Boys is the story of what life was like in 1965 Tokyo for Kazuo, a nine year old boy. Written for middle readers, this collection of stories is sure to resonate with 4th and 5th grade boys. The situations, while set in a vastly different world than today, are still similar and resonate deeply. The book is filled with sidenotes explaining unfamiliar terms and cultural [...]

    • Jessie says:

      In compliance with FTC guidelines, I disclose that I received the book for free through First Reads.This book is a sweet, innocent look at a young boy growing up in a changing Japanese world. It is semi-autobiographical in that the stories are some what based on the author's experiences and childhood memories. Some of the stories made me laugh; others almost brought me to tears. It was interesting to me (being of Japanese descent myself) reading about the culture in the 1960s and how Japan beca [...]

    • Andres Eguiguren says:

      The cover and the title of the book sum up these auto-biographical, historical fiction snippets into the life of a nine-year-old boy growing up in Tokyo in the mid-1960s. It's a light read, and I almost put it aside after the first couple of chapters, but it does capture (I believe) what it was like to grow up in the capital some twenty years after the end of the Second World War and only a year after hosting the 1964 Olympics. The interconnected short stories are accompanied by historical photo [...]

    • Jackie says:

      In 1965, Kazuo Nakamoto is living in Toyko with his family which is still recovering from WWII and its aftermath. American culture, TV, and a changing face of Toyko are all influential on Kazuo's family.J-Boys: Kazuo's World, Tokyo, 1965 is a realistic glimpse into the daily activities of this Japanese family in the mid-60's. Yet, for a 9 year-old boy, many things remain the sameowing up, fitting in, teachers, girls, in short, growing up and coming of age. A delightful story with historical note [...]

    • Holly Thompson says:

      J-Boys gives readers a chance to time travel back to 1960s Tokyo through the eyes of nine-year-old Kazuo Nakamoto as he tries to make sense of the changes to his Shinagawa neighborhood and the world. Rich with details of day-to-day Japan life, and enhanced with photographs and notes, J-Boys offers deep and lasting insights into family and school life, foods, seasonal rituals and the all-important sense of community.

    • Diane Nagatomo says:

      I didn't realize that this was a children's book (upper elementary level) when I ordered it from , but it was a very charming story about two boys growing up in Tokyo during the mid-1960s--at a time when American culture (mainly through TV) was influencing Japan's youth. Lots of photos and text boxes explaining various aspects of Japanese language and culture makes this book a useful book for anyone interested in Japan.

    • Hugh Ashton says:

      I enjoyed this - it's a part of life that was lived by many of my Japanese friends, and it allowed me to see how they grew up, through their eyes. The stories are sometimes funny, sometimes touching, and always informative.

    • Laura says:

      J- Boys gives a glimpse into a different world. The characters are compelling and the side boxes offer interesting information. It is a great book for middle-schoolers interested in other cultures. I am going to use it for summer school this year.

    • Caroline says:

      Not something I would pick up and read usually but it was very interesting to read about the different characters and Japan during this time period

    • Naomi Blackburn says:

      Really a nice and cool read for a young boy. Full of adventure, plus the author lays out translations for Japanese words. I enjoyed this book reading it from a juevenile perspective.

    • Susanna says:

      J-Boys is a series of short, anecdotal stories covering Kazuo's life between the October and April of one year. Each story is basically concerned with one or two aspects of Japanese culture and Tokyo life in the 1960s: tofu, public bathhouses, education, New Year's, memories of WWII, etc. Not only is the cultural and historical information interesting, but tracing the melding of traditional Japanese culture with Western influences is fascinating as well.While the information presented in this bo [...]

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