To Kill or Cure

To Kill or Cure Cambridge University is in dire financial straits the town s landlords are demanding an extortionate rent rise for the students hostels and the plague years have left the colleges with scant resources

  • Title: To Kill or Cure
  • Author: Susanna Gregory
  • ISBN: 9781847440327
  • Page: 397
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Cambridge University is in dire financial straits the town s landlords are demanding an extortionate rent rise for the students hostels and the plague years have left the colleges with scant resources Tension between town and gown is at a boiling point and soon explodes into violence and death Into this maelstrom comes a charismatic physician whose healing methods owe mCambridge University is in dire financial straits the town s landlords are demanding an extortionate rent rise for the students hostels and the plague years have left the colleges with scant resources Tension between town and gown is at a boiling point and soon explodes into violence and death Into this maelstrom comes a charismatic physician whose healing methods owe to magic than medicine but his success threatens Matthew Bartholomew s professional reputation, and his life.

    692 Comment

    • Laura says:

      This is from another one of those historical mystery series - medieval setting (Cambridge in the 1300s), town/gown tensions, monks galore. The sad thing is that every one that I've read barring Ellis Peters' Brother Cadfael takes themselves so seriously it hurts.The conflict here is threefold. One, an outsider claims to be a better doctor than the ones currently practicing in town; two, the town wants to raise rents on the hostels occupied by the varying University students; three, who killed We [...]

    • Symon Hill says:

      Enjoyable and engaging if not very original. The first few Matthew Bartholomew books were very good (the first one was excellent), but now I've reached Number 13 and they've settled down to a fairly predictable formula. They have engaging characters and interesting plots, and are very readable, but they tend to have a set structure and the murders and horrors they describe don't seem to have much effect on the people involved. As crime novels go, they're quite fluffy and in this regard, the seri [...]

    • Lacer says:

      I had not thought much of the previous book in the Matthew Bartholomew series (The Tarnished Chalice), so I was glad to see that To Kill or Cure was back on form. Cambridge is gripped by the Rent War (university statutes that placed restrictive rents on property that they used), so tensions between the town and university are even higher than normal. This is not helped by a new healer in town, who is working very hard discredit the university physicians. Add to that, two new Fellows at Michaelho [...]

    • Susan Aldridge says:

      It took me a while to get into this. I was thinking this is just a long-winded tale about monks in Cambridge in the 14th century. But I was won over - it is, in fact, very atmospheric and raises some interesting points about medieval medicine and the plot is good. I'm a big fan of Shardlake in the CJ Sansom Tudor novels and was interested to find that there is a long series of Matthew Bartholomew novels which I may get into at some point. Listened to this on audible and it was beautifully read, [...]

    • David Brown says:

      Much better than recent efforts - a complex plot, involving rent disputes, a fake medic and some bitchy academic politics, introducing and then removing several new characters in rapid succession. Pacy, adding to e central characters without distracting from the main plot, it was an excellent read

    • Shannon says:

      Another great read in the Matthew Bartholomew series.

    • Dulshani says:

      This was my first book by the author. Overall, I found the plot long-winded, but the historical details were rich and well-researched.

    • Mikeh5972 says:

      I found this to be enjoyable but rather too long drawn out. There was a surfeit of characters under suspicion. We could have done with fewer suspects. I never cease to be surprised by the odd surnames of so many inhabitants of medieval Cambridge.

    • Ann says:

      It is 1357 and the town of Cambridge England is in turmoil. The town property owners are demanding rent increases at the hostels that house students and the college is refusing to pay more. On top of this unrest, a new physician arrives in town who is healing people with the wave of his magic feather. He even raises a man from the grave. Matthew Bartholemew and the other physicians in the town know he is a charlatan but the townspeople are all flocking to him. Richard Ardene, the new physician, [...]

    • Carmen says:

      The town almost explodes in anarchy in this story. Money issues are a problem, how much to charge for rents, etc, and a fake healer comes to town who claims to be able to cure people with a magic feather. He tells everyone that there are answers for everything, if he does not think he can cure someone, he says they have a bad spirit. It is amazing how superstitious people were. Reading this book with all the historical details really makes the time period come alive. Plus there is a mystery to s [...]

    • Rachel says:

      I haven't read any of the other Matthew Bartholomew books and picked this up at the library after reading dissolution and wanting to stay in the same theme. It was ok, not great, a bit drawn out and the mystery really wasn't that mysterious. The characters were a bit annoying and two-dimensional and I seriously found MB really thick. I don't think I will bother reading any of the other MB books after this one.

    • William says:

      My complaint with this book is the same as with most of the previous books in this series. Other than the main character (Matthew) EVERYONE is either evil or somehow morally defective and nothing good ever happens to Matthew. It makes for a very depressing story and the plot line always seems too long and drawn out. I like to finish each series that I start, but this series is making it very difficult to meet that goal.

    • Charlotte says:

      I read and enjoyed the first 12 Matthew Bartholomew books, but could not get into this one - the characters and background themes are becoming stale. Matthew and Michael are what they are. I don't like the personal lives and miseries of the main characters in a mystery to overwhelm the story (as I find they do in the later Alan Banks novels by Peter Robinson), but a little evolution in their lives keeps the story fresh. For me, Lindsey Davis hits a happy medium in her Falco mysteries.

    • Laura says:

      Nice to see out heros back in Cambridge. interesting plotline great read looking forward to the next book.

    • Linda says:

      Good mystery but read it more for the slice of (Medieval) life it offers. Written by a Cambridge academic, it's a page turner.

    • Riversue says:

      A real page-turner - I love historical mysteries but this one was immersive. The characters will stay with me for a long time.

    • Andy Field says:

      A very good read, one of her better whodunits. A cast of interesting and some horrible characters and a good plot that kept me guessing almost to the end.

    • Sydney says:

      I like the history in the story; not well-edited, though.

    • Veronica says:

      An enjoyable novel with interesting strong characters and a plot that keeps moving. Got a bit bogged down mid way.

    • Kim Counts says:

      I love these books, but this one seemed to rehash several components of plots from previous installments in the series. It finished pretty well, but floundered a bit.

    • Philip Cook says:

      Still smiling!

    • Richard Stueber says:

      Number 13 in the series and probably the most complicated to date. Matthew Bartholomew and Brother Michael have a hard time getting a handle on the various deaths.

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