The Stone That Never Came Down

The Stone That Never Came Down Europe in the st Century is a stricken continent Cities crumble with neglect Governments topple to military coups But one man may have the answer It is a viral drug that drastically alters the human

  • Title: The Stone That Never Came Down
  • Author: John Brunner
  • ISBN: 9780385037167
  • Page: 314
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Europe in the 21st Century is a stricken continent Cities crumble with neglect Governments topple to military coups But one man may have the answer It is a viral drug that drastically alters the human mind, a cure for depression, unemployment, war, madness, national hatreds, prejudice, crime mass hysteria, but there were those who wanted the cure suppressed untilEurope in the 21st Century is a stricken continent Cities crumble with neglect Governments topple to military coups But one man may have the answer It is a viral drug that drastically alters the human mind, a cure for depression, unemployment, war, madness, national hatreds, prejudice, crime mass hysteria, but there were those who wanted the cure suppressed until the world collapsed.

    729 Comment

    • Joe says:

      Clever ideas and well written. I doubted the book to start with but it picks up well and I greatly enjoyed it in the end. An introspective on war and the human condition. Also my first ever John Brunner book but will not be the last.

    • Ken says:

      This is a novel written in 1973, and has always been a favorite of mine, and this is probably the third or fourth time that I have read this fine book. Although the tale is set primarily in England, it describes a dystopia in which poverty, inflation, unemployment, and disillusionment are rampant around the world, and WW III seems just around the corner. And, to make matters worse, members of a right-wing political/religious group, The Campaign Against Moral Pollution (Godheads), are armed with [...]

    • Lera says:

      A morality tale, but an entertaining one. On the brink of WWIII, can a new virus save humanity? Rather sweet and 70s that the only thing he thought wouldn't be affected was partying and recreational drug use.

    • Kent says:

      A solid SF effort from Brunner. This is only my second book from him, but I shall b reading more. This story describes a near future, might as well be now, where the world is on the brink of war. There are massive labor strikes around Europe, religious violence from a group of moral protectors, and confrontations between the countries of Europe. A man receives a drug from a scientist and starts feeling very different. The scientist is then murdered. This drug has the power to give the user a cle [...]

    • Raomer says:

      Like one said before me:Due to the poor editing and plenty of printing errors only four stars; otherwise it could have been five!Great story, i hope there will be a revival of John Brunners books. And really scary when you think this book is from the seventies, but it could play today.

    • Dave Lefevre says:

      I discovered John Brunner though a reference to "The Sheep Look Up" I read at some point this year. I think he is an overlooked Science Fiction master close to the level of Phillip K. Dick. The problem is that he hasn't been rediscovered yet. He needs to be.I posted in an update that Brunner is an uncomfortable read. You might refer back to a couple of posts that I made about Brunner. He predicts trends in society (albeit that, like Phil Dick, he predicted certain things in society to happen ear [...]

    • Andy Holyer says:

      Discovered this on my bookshelves, and somehow I've never read it before.Judging by the chisel mark in the top I must have bought it as a remainder.What a discovery! Set in Kentish Town, in a Britain in severe recession (two million unemployed - remember that), severe economic crises in er Greece and Italy, potential breakdown of - OK, it's still called the Common Market, but you get the idea.Written in 1973 (Brunner died in 1995), but despite the cassette tapes and telephones with handsets, i [...]

    • Charles Harrison says:

      Phew, emotionally heavy going as I have come to expect from Brunner. When he says Europe is on the brink of destruction he does not mess around. The rise of right wing movements, troops on the streets and religious fanaticism is believable as it is terrifying. Thankfully the 21st century as he saw it is no way near as bad but odd echoes are here and then which just adds to my respect for this work written more than 40 years ago. The fact that (spoiler) the interesting debate around medical ethic [...]

    • Edwin says:

      It was nice to read a book again with a happy ending. You hardly ever hear about Brunner, which is a big shame, because he's such a great SF writer. His foresight is pretty unbelievable. Super rich top class and poor class getting poorer all the time - check. EU countries getting more and more nationalistic in response to European integration - check. Riots in many EU countries - check. Christian fundamentalism getting more prominent in public discourse (Tea party like) - check. Anti gay movemen [...]

    • Owain Lewis says:

      Cute and fun, which is probably why the New Worlds critics gave Brunner such a kicking; that and the prose, which is, at best, utillitarian - my how he loves an adverb! All that aside it's a nice slice of wishful thinking and a lovely escape from the the shitstorm of current affairs. Brunner's reading of the way that late capitalism might progress is actually pretty astute but his solution, well, it's a beautiful dream but I didn't mind buying into it for 200 pages. Now give me some post-apocaly [...]

    • TS Waterman says:

      Brilliant story from the always prescient Brunner. Set in a near-future (from the time of writing, 1973), it outlines a world sliding into global depression, with the resulting rise in racism, class warfare, and church-supplied self-righteousness, coutries defaulting from the European coalition, etc. Brunner has a recipe for a utopian solution that is bit untenable in reality, but serves well to explore the shortcomings of us humans as a rational species.

    • Sara says:

      Although I am a big fan of John Brunner, none of his other works have quite come up to the level of "The Sheep Look Up" or "Stand on Zanzibar." I enjoyed the setting of this novel in Europe, and the idea that was raised in the story about a specie being aware of its own evolution, but didn't find the characters particularly engaging, though some were all too accurate in their depiction of contemporary political figures.

    • Ron says:

      A work of genius from the 70s that combines elements of Orwell and Huxley and paints an eerily accurate picture of what the world has become (because he was prescient enough to see that the gears were in motion, even then). The world could use more writers like Brunner now, rather than the fantasists who have nothing to say.

    • TorbjörnDahl says:

      Due to the poor editing and plenty of printing errors only three stars; otherwise it could have been four!The idea is very good, but today the time is a different one. Good reading though, especially if you remember the times of early seventies.

    • Erik Graff says:

      John Brunner was one of my favorite science fiction writers. This is typical of his socially relevant, and in this case optimistic, science fiction. My notecard on this one has penned the single word "excellent".

    • Al says:

      Nice little sci-fi.

    • Jon Davis says:

      Always a good read for the dystopian future it shows as well as how people handle the strangeness of the new as it hits them.

    • Deedee says:

      1970's optimistic science fiction -- optimistic even in the face of pessimistic conditions

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