Killing the White Man's Indian: Reinventing Native Americans at the End of the Twentieth Century

Killing the White Man s Indian Reinventing Native Americans at the End of the Twentieth Century In the face of a new lightly romanticized view of Native Americans Killing the White Man s Indian bravely confronts the current myths and often contradictory realities of tribal life today Following

  • Title: Killing the White Man's Indian: Reinventing Native Americans at the End of the Twentieth Century
  • Author: Fergus M. Bordewich
  • ISBN: 9780385420365
  • Page: 224
  • Format: Paperback
  • In the face of a new lightly romanticized view of Native Americans, Killing the White Man s Indian bravely confronts the current myths and often contradictory realities of tribal life today Following two centuries of broken treaties and virtual government extermination of the savage redmen, Americans today have recast Native Americans into another, equally stereotyped rIn the face of a new lightly romanticized view of Native Americans, Killing the White Man s Indian bravely confronts the current myths and often contradictory realities of tribal life today Following two centuries of broken treaties and virtual government extermination of the savage redmen, Americans today have recast Native Americans into another, equally stereotyped role, that of eternal victims, politically powerless and weakened by poverty and alcoholism, yet whose spiritual ties with the natural world form our last, best hope of salvaging our natural environment and ennobling our souls.The truth, however, is neither as grim , nor as blindly idealistic, as many would expect The fact is that a virtual revolution is underway in Indian Country, an upheaval of epic proportions For the first time in generations, Indians are shaping their own destinies, largely beyond the control of whites, reinventing Indian education and justice, exploiting the principle of tribal sovereignty in ways that empower tribal governments far beyond most American s imaginations While new found power has enriched tribal life and prospects, and has made Native Americans fuller participants in the American dream, it has brought tribal governments into direct conflict with local economics and the federal government.Based on three years of research on the Native American reservations, and written without a hidden conservative bias or politically correct agenda, Killing the White Man s Indian takes on Native American politics and policies today in all their contradictory and controversial guises.

    150 Comment

    • Chris says:

      This was a very informative book and one that I will spend a lot of time thinking about. The goal of the book wasn't to place the blame on the hardships that Native Americans have today on anyone - the answer to that is obvious. It's white people, the Europeans who came here in the fifteenth century. It goes beyond this and raises some very interesting questions. White Americans have always seen Indians through various lenses - savage, child of nature, drunk or something else. However, those ste [...]

    • Dean Akin says:

      A fair look at the unraveling story of what it means to be a Native American Indian. The author is very sympathetic to the problems of the indian culture and tribal life but is not blinded by the myths and contradictions that make up much of the modern retelling of the history of the American indian. Instead of telling the same old monotonous, often historically unbalanced, story of "White man bad, Red man good", Bordewich is intellectually more honest then most in his assessment of the problems [...]

    • Rae says:

      One of the finest books written on United States Indian relations. The author is objective, coming down just as hard on the Native Americans as he does on the US government. I highly recommend this for anyone wanting background and understanding on the subject.

    • Rachel says:

      This non fiction book is an intelligent discussion and appraisal of where native Americans are in US society today and what their future holds. It is challenging and critical but even handed. An excellent read for those wanting to get beyond the myths of who the native Americans are.

    • j.marvin says:

      Nothing better on contemporary Indians.Nothing better on contemporary white ranchers who live near contemporary Indians.

    • Nichole says:

      read this for my native american history class. it's an eye opener for those of us without much knowledge of the modern native american.

    • Daria Boissonnas says:

      As a nonfiction writer myself, I return to this book to study the quality of the writing, which is vivid, insightful, and brilliant -- creative nonfiction at its best. The author also wields irony with a gentle hand. He shares his unique personal perspective as he takes us along on his explorations and asks tough questions, often leaving the reader to make up his/her own mind.As far as content, his is an eye-opening perspective that I appreciate -- that our common culture has romanticized native [...]

    • April Brown says:

      What ages would I recommend it too? – Fourteen and up. Length? – Several days read.Characters? – Memorable, several characters.Setting? – Historical and Modern United States.Written approximately? – 1996.Does the story leave questions in the readers mind? – Yes. What will happen next? Will other minority's follow their lead?.Any issues the author (or a more recent publisher) should cover? It would be nice to have a website with links to updated information.Short storyline: This book [...]

    • Craig says:

      It's not all feathers and beads in this book. Through this book, Bordewich is determined to destroy the main stream view of American Indians; he does this through a number of specific cases like, for instance, the Lumbee's struggle to gain federal recognition in a time when a certain "standard" for an American Indian predominates American culture. A must read for anyone interested in what defines a "true Indian."

    • Joe Echo-hawk says:

      Must read for anyone interested in the complexities that indigenous cultures living in the land of their conquerors face. It is complicated on both sides, and this book explains many aspects of the history that is not taught in our common history courses.

    • Rachel says:

      What an amazing eye opening book! There was so much I didn't understand and that broke my heart reading. I couldn't believe the way some native americans are treated just because they are native! I really feel this book should be on everyone's bookshelf.

    • Eric Wright says:

      Thoroughly researched. A good entry point into contemporary Native American policy and concerns from a balanced perspective.

    • Miranda says:

      A book I am reading for a college course. Some parts are very insighful. Overall a bit of a tough read for me

    • Jessica Ennis says:

      Excellent perspective into Indian Reservations!

    • Rebecca Soliday says:

      wow. one of the best books I've read in a long time.

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