The Future of Ritual: Writings on Culture and Performance

The Future of Ritual Writings on Culture and Performance In The Future of Ritual Richard Schechner explores the nature of ritualised behaviour and its relationship to performance and politics A brilliant and uncontainable examination of cultural expression

  • Title: The Future of Ritual: Writings on Culture and Performance
  • Author: Richard Schechner
  • ISBN: 9780415046909
  • Page: 430
  • Format: Paperback
  • In The Future of Ritual, Richard Schechner explores the nature of ritualised behaviour and its relationship to performance and politics A brilliant and uncontainable examination of cultural expression and communal action, The Future of Ritual asks pertinent questions about art, theatre and the changing meaning of culture in today s intercultural world An exciting new wIn The Future of Ritual, Richard Schechner explores the nature of ritualised behaviour and its relationship to performance and politics A brilliant and uncontainable examination of cultural expression and communal action, The Future of Ritual asks pertinent questions about art, theatre and the changing meaning of culture in today s intercultural world An exciting new work by the author of Performance Theory.

    787 Comment

    • Lisa Orki says:

      I was essentially interested into Wayang Kulit. Schechner explains how wayang evolved, especially under the Dutch colonialism. From a "religious" art, it turned into a teacher art with many written rules. With Indenonesia independence, wayang became politic and manipulated by different government. Schechner opens the question of a "traditional" vs. "modernist" wayang and if it does still has a meaning nowadays or did it become a Western distraction Definitely a great book. Good to have another [...]

    • Michael Meeuwis says:

      I find Schechner's "Performance Theory" (not exactly an indie pick) an endlessly useful text for generating ideas, and was excited to read some of his other work. The two long descriptions of performance events in India and Java are interesting, but not terribly analytic--I just didn't find there was much there in excess of a narrative description of the events happening. I feel like the big theoretical payoff promised by the last chapter, which is called "The Future of Ritual," never really hap [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *