Modest_witness@second_millennium.Femaleman_meets_oncomouse: Feminism and Technoscience

Modest_witness second_millennium Femaleman_meets_oncomouse Feminism and Technoscience Modest_Witness Second_Millenium FemaleMan_Meets_OncoMouse explores the roles of stories figures dreams theories facts delusions advertising institutions economic arrangements publishing pract

  • Title: Modest_witness@second_millennium.Femaleman_meets_oncomouse: Feminism and Technoscience
  • Author: Donna J. Haraway Lynn M. Randolph
  • ISBN: 9780415912457
  • Page: 202
  • Format: Paperback
  • Modest_Witness Second_Millenium.FemaleMan_Meets_OncoMouse explores the roles of stories, figures, dreams, theories, facts, delusions, advertising, institutions, economic arrangements, publishing practices, scientific advances, and politics in twentieth century technoscience The book s title is an e mail address With it, Haraway locates herself and her readers in a sprawlModest_Witness Second_Millenium.FemaleMan_Meets_OncoMouse explores the roles of stories, figures, dreams, theories, facts, delusions, advertising, institutions, economic arrangements, publishing practices, scientific advances, and politics in twentieth century technoscience The book s title is an e mail address With it, Haraway locates herself and her readers in a sprawling net of associations far flung than the Internet The address is not a cozy home There is no innocent place to stand in the world where the book s author figure, FemaleMan, encounters DuPont s controversial laboratory rodent, OncoMouse.

    244 Comment

    • Ralowe Ampu says:

      this note is to mark my completion of donna haraway's printed bound corpus. this might definitely be my favorite book maybe. i mean primate visions is really fucking good. what factors is my intensified stake in finally uncovering a sturdier conception of the meaningful recurring term "material-semiotic" throughout haraway's work. i think i understand the experimental laboratory as a potent site where a significant link between "material-semotics" and "what counts" is made in the process of prod [...]

    • Meghan Fidler says:

      “Witnessing the Culture of No Culture”Haraway as an Oncomouse While Haraway demonstrates a number of very important insights about technology in science, or technoscience, my overall reaction was a troubled feeling, a small curl of dread slipping through my stomach. Despite the transgression of agent-subject-self-object in this description, my disagreement was not, as Haraway had hoped, a result of the genetic technologies advertisements (Haraway 1997 151), the poverty of scientifically form [...]

    • g says:

      I don't know why it took me so long to open this book, but once I opened it, it was so quick to read. Haraway's language is brave and welcoming, her comments are thoughtful, her subject matter is provocative. She combines reviews of sci-fi novels, visual representations of her subject matter, and well-informed discussions of academic texts, in a way that embraces the reader. Her relationship to her students is also amazing, as many of her citations are unpublished manuscripts that her students c [...]

    • Alli says:

      Required reading for my science and technology studies course this semester. Really good, though very dense read. Despite that it is 27 years old, and its dated-ness is pretty obvious in places, it is impressive that in many ways it is still a very relevant examination of what she refers to as "technoscience" (no hyphen).

    • Wealhtheow says:

      Haraway is crazy like a fox. I'm never sure how much of her writing I should take seriously and how much she just throws out there to wake people's brains up. Regardless, she has some great ideas and some incredibly stupid ones, but her writing is never mediocre.

    • Erica says:

      Most difficult book I've ever read in my entire life. Thought-provoking? Yes. Helping in actually living? Still up in the air.

    • Hafsa says:

      This went way over my head

    • K says:

      Kicked off my feminist scifi stint through constant references to Joanna Russ' Female Man and Marge Piercy.

    • katie says:

      fantastic. haraway is one of the most interesting thinkers i've ever read. at times her language is unbelievably beautiful.

    • Alexis says:

      Read for the second time, with new hope for a techno-science future. Sort of.

    • Amy says:

      I've read the first . . . maybe 100 pages of this book, and I can't wait to read the rest of it.

    • Justiina Dahl says:

      I am only on the second chapter and completely on fire over Haraway's ideas on technoscience.

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