Havana Lunar

Havana Lunar One hungry hallucinatory night in the dark heart of Havana Mano Rodriguez a young doctor with the revolutionary medical service comes to the aid of a teenage jinetera named Julia She takes refuge

  • Title: Havana Lunar
  • Author: Robert Arellano
  • ISBN: 9781933354682
  • Page: 157
  • Format: Paperback
  • One hungry, hallucinatory night in the dark heart of Havana, Mano Rodriguez, a young doctor with the revolutionary medical service, comes to the aid of a teenage jinetera named Julia She takes refuge in his clinic to break away from the abusive chulo who prostituted her, and they form an unlikely allegiance that Mano thinks might save him from his twin burdens the dead eOne hungry, hallucinatory night in the dark heart of Havana, Mano Rodriguez, a young doctor with the revolutionary medical service, comes to the aid of a teenage jinetera named Julia She takes refuge in his clinic to break away from the abusive chulo who prostituted her, and they form an unlikely allegiance that Mano thinks might save him from his twin burdens the dead end hospital assignment he was delegated after being blacklisted by the Cuban Communist Party and a Palo Monte curse on his love life commissioned by a vengeful ex wife But when the pimp and his bodyguards come after Julia and Mano, the violent chain reaction plunges them all into the decadent catacombs of Havana s criminal underworld.Inspired by fifty years of Cuban literary noir, from Cold Tales by Virgilio Pi era to Reinaldo Arenas Before Night Falls, Robert Arellano s Havana Lunar intertwines an insider testimony on the collapse of socialist Cuba with a psychological mystery.

    480 Comment

    • Brent Legault says:

      You have coffee?There is a lot of want in Bob's novel but not a lot left wanting. Oh, there were times when I wished he'd be more careful about his language, avoid a few shopworn phrases. And I often didn't understand his technique of using Spanish and not-using Spanish. I sort of wished that the Spanish would have taken over the novel by novel's end; that what began as a 5/95 English/Spanish chiarscuro would have traded its ying for yang, as it were and taught me how to habla the lingo. As it i [...]

    • Robert says:

      I have had limited exposure to Cuban culture. Primarily it has been through the small Hispanic neighborhoods of Boston, and on one occasion, during a brief visit to the city of Miami. Arellano's Havana Lunar is aptly described as Cuban Noir, and I found that classification fits its mood well. The story follows the daily life of a doctor, Manolo or 'Mano'as his family calls him, in the Cuba of the 90's, left alone to sustain itself following decades of complacency in the economic patronage shown [...]

    • Michael Niemann says:

      Outstanding noir set in Cuba. Manolo is the kind of doctor you'd want to care for you, no matter where. He takes his time, has kind words even for the downtrodden. And that was before a police hocho presses him into an investigation that’s far from his regular metier. A great snapshot of Cuba and a great character, who's neither a Che, not a Miami reactionary.

    • Chuck says:

      Really interesting book by an author who is new to me; Arellano apparently traveled back and forth to Cuba ten times while working on this.Mano Rodriguez grew up in Cuba, born in the late sixties. The novel has multiple time lines; the "present" is 1992, as the Soviet Union is crumbling and, as a result, the economy of Cuba is crumbling and nobody has anything. Hunger is a recurring theme in the book, and all the characters are hungry, not only for food, but for hope, for meaning, for possiblity [...]

    • Chazlyn says:

      If you're reading Havana Lunar be prepared for an undertaking if you aren't versed in Cuban history. If you're like me and you know absolutely nothing about Cuba (and your spanish is a bit rusty) you're going to have to muddle through this one and keep a spanish to english dictionary nearby. For the most part you can figure the meanings out by context, but in my opinion you lose something going that route. Knowing what is being said helps give the characters more depth. The first part of this no [...]

    • Spencer says:

      Socialism in cuba, an oppresive government and cuban poverty, what else can be worse? Havana Lunar combines the flaws of cuba with a drama that is like no other. The story depicts the life of a young girl who is oppressed by a pimp who escapes and falls in love with a young doctor. the story gives you a taste of life in cuba as well as history and cultural aspects of the beautiful but communist island. I strongly recommend this book for someone who is interested in latin culture and/or action pa [...]

    • ABC Group says:

      Just finished this book. Not bad at all, but none too thrilling.

    • Sally Fry says:

      This just did not hold my interest so I didn't finish it.

    • Janis Williams says:

      Cuban locale was interesting. Non-linear chapters were a little confusing, but maybe I am just getting old.

    • Maggie says:

      If you can believe a thirty something pediatrician can fall in love with an underage prostitute you make like this (sorry, no sex scenes).

    • Despina says:

      A bleak picture of Havana, but an interesting and realistic one.

    • Gregory says:

      This is an evocative book about Cuba's Special Period. Toward the end, it even takes on the quality of thriller to a certain degree.

    • Mills College Library says:

      Fiction A679h 2009

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