The Baltimore Rowhouse

The Baltimore Rowhouse Perhaps no other American city is so defined by an indigenous architectural style as Balti is by the rowhouse whose brick facades march up and down the gentle hills of the city Why did the rowhouse t

  • Title: The Baltimore Rowhouse
  • Author: Mary Ellen Hayward Charles Belfoure
  • ISBN: 9781568982830
  • Page: 464
  • Format: Paperback
  • Perhaps no other American city is so defined by an indigenous architectural style as Balti is by the rowhouse, whose brick facades march up and down the gentle hills of the city Why did the rowhouse thrive in Balti How did it escape destruction here, unlike in many other historic American cities What were the forces that led to the citywide renovation of BaltimoPerhaps no other American city is so defined by an indigenous architectural style as Balti is by the rowhouse, whose brick facades march up and down the gentle hills of the city Why did the rowhouse thrive in Balti How did it escape destruction here, unlike in many other historic American cities What were the forces that led to the citywide renovation of Balti s rowhouses The Balti Rowhouse is the fascinating 200 year story of this building type It chronicles the evolution of the rowhouse from its origins as speculative housing for immigrants, through its reclamation and renovation by young urban pioneers thanks to local government sponsorship, to its current occupation by a new cadre of wealthy professionals The Balti Rowhouse was winner of the 2000 Maryland Historical Trust Heritage Book Award for outstanding books of scholarly or general interest.

    604 Comment

    • Philip Porter says:

      Here's what I liked: the detailed history of some the of the neighborhoods and the perspective on the development process for the rowhouse as a type. Here's what I found challenging: the use of architecture terms without definition, the repetition, the historical facts without context, the repetitiveness of the analysis. I think they needed a different editor. As a non-architect, I wanted to learn about the different types of row houses I see or have been in. But the architectural jargon was ali [...]

    • Callie says:

      A bit tedious in detail at times, but overall a fascinating tale of Baltimore history though the story of how Charm City's unique residential architecture came to be. Having lived in one of these beautiful row houses, I loved this book. I am not an architecture professor, but if I were, I'd make my students read it.

    • Cynthia says:

      Mary Ellen Hayward is pretty much the go-to-gal for Baltimore history, it seems. This volume is very detailed, and I love the abundance of historic photographs and blueprints. I am a bit disappointed in her system of annotation, but I'm sure I'll find what I'm looking for eventually.

    • Chris says:

      Too much of this book is a listing of where and when rowhouse developments were constructed and what they looked like. But the narratives about the residents who occupied these homes and the developers who built them--the career of E.J. Gallagher receives much attention--was much more interesting.

    • Erin says:

      Annoy your friends as you walk around the city with tidbits like "that brick pattern is called Flemish bond and means the house was built before 1820" and "those flower panels make that house Queen Anne style."

    • Bynum says:

      I probably wouldn't find this as interesting if I wasn't surrounded by Baltimore rowhouses, but it is still probably of general interest to those interested in the vernacular.

    • Becky says:

      Oy. Not that interesting. I flipped through it and looked at the pictures, but I didn't read more than a couple dozen pages.

    • diana says:

      One of my favorite non-fiction books about Baltimore. I continually refer to it, or I did before I moved to Germany.

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