The Incredible Shrinking Son of Man: How Reliable is the Gospel Tradition?

The Incredible Shrinking Son of Man How Reliable is the Gospel Tradition This book should be mandatory reading for all scholars concerned with Christian origins nothing of comparable importance has been written for at least a decade FreethinkerFor than a century scholars h

  • Title: The Incredible Shrinking Son of Man: How Reliable is the Gospel Tradition?
  • Author: Robert M. Price
  • ISBN: 9781591021216
  • Page: 409
  • Format: Hardcover
  • This book should be mandatory reading for all scholars concerned with Christian origins nothing of comparable importance has been written for at least a decade FreethinkerFor than a century scholars have been examining the Gospels and other traditions about the life of Jesus to determine their historical accuracy Although the results of these scholarly effor This book should be mandatory reading for all scholars concerned with Christian origins nothing of comparable importance has been written for at least a decade FreethinkerFor than a century scholars have been examining the Gospels and other traditions about the life of Jesus to determine their historical accuracy Although the results of these scholarly efforts are sometimes controversial, the consensus among researchers today is that the four Evangelists accounts cannot be taken at face value In fact, a team of than 100 scholars called the Jesus Seminar has come to the conclusion that on average only about 18 percent of the four Gospels is historically accurate.An active member of the Jesus Seminar, Dr Robert M Price presents the fruits of this important historical research in this fascinating discussion of early Christianity As the title suggests, Price is none too optimistic about the reliability of the Gospel tradition as a source of accurate historical information about the life of Jesus Indeed, he feels that his colleagues in the Jesus Seminar are much too optimistic in their estimate of authentic material in the Gospels After an introduction to the historical critical method for nonspecialists and a critique of the methods used by the Jesus Seminar, Price systematically discusses the narrative and teaching materials in the Gospel, clearly presenting what is known and not known about all of the major episodes of Jesus life He also examines the parables for authenticity as well as Jesus teachings about the Kingdom of God, repentance, prayer, possessions and poverty, the Atonement, and many other features of the Gospels.Written for the general reading public in a lively and accessible style, Dr Price s highly informative discussion will be of interest to anyone who has wondered about the origins of Christianity.

    977 Comment

    • Brian Smith says:

      If you are interested in sound Christian theology left of the Jesus Seminar, Robert Price is worth checking out. But before one reduces his thinking to the "Jesus as myth" school of thought, one should consider his overall premise: theology is a narrative constructing field that is fraught with epistemological complications (if not fallacies). With this in mind, his approach (if not strategy) seems to be to construct many plausible (and even at times contradictory) narratives while affirming non [...]

    • Ana Mardoll says:

      The Incredible Shrinking Son of Man / 9781615920280I first heard of Robert Price as a interview subject in the documentary "The God Who Wasn't There". I was deeply impressed with his calm, scholarly manner, as well as with the respect he brought towards the subject, and I picked up several of his books out of curiosity. "The Incredible Shrinking Son of Man" is, in my opinion, probably Price's greatest work. In this scholarly and fascinating work, he looks at the gospel traditions in the New Test [...]

    • Fred Kohn says:

      Given Price's massive reputation as a N.T. scholar, I was pretty shocked at how bad this book was. Although most of the raw data were interesting and probably factual, the polemical tone of the whole thing made the book difficult to get through. There were several facts that I knew were flat out wrong from prior reading, and a couple others that didn't check out when I looked them up. Price wields the criterion of dissimilarity like a bludgeon, removing any trace of anything that might possibly [...]

    • John says:

      Many reviewers have found this book somewhat confusing and difficult to follow. I found it fast-paced and challenging but generally terrific. Price almost assumes the reader has a basic understanding of of bible history including the basic sources such as Q, the Gospel of Thomas, the Dead Sea Scrolls, etc. I was fascinated with Price relating so many of the gospel stories to their potential sources including the Mishneh Torah, Buddhism, Dionysus, Pythagoras, Thucydides (and other pagan gods)and [...]

    • Peter Stanbridge says:

      I think this book provides a case for the mythical Jesus. Layer upon layer of historical foundation for jesus of Nazareth until like the layers of onion rings, there is nothing left. He doesn't prove his case, but makes it a live option, and one Price anyway, has become more convinced over the years studying this history.

    • Eric Wojciechowski says:

      By the time you reach the end of this study, the title is proved. If there really was a historical Jesus, he's been lost to history. All we have left are pieces of propaganda from competing budding Christian sects, trying to establish their superiority over each other. From Mark and Paul who felt there was no need to be Jewish first and welcomed the Gentiles to Matthew and Luke who did a job on Mark to “correct” him, reinstating that being a Jew first before a Christian was a requirement. An [...]

    • Rebecca says:

      didn't keep my attention

    • Stefan says:

      A vast majority of the populace sees Biblical scholarship as incredibly dull and boring. It's a shame, really, as no other book in the history of our species has had an influence on Western civilization like that of the Bible. Price's knowledge is vast and seemingly omniscient ;) It is also impossible not to learn a great deal from this well written, highly technical book that indeed requires you have background knowledge about the topic beforehand. For a more introductory book, I suggest 'Decon [...]

    • Aoife says:

      I've gone as far as my Christian school junior high education will take me, I fear. We've reached a point in the gospels where I don't even recognize what's happening anymore. Guess they were too hung up on foot washing and how girls couldn't be class president to cover this stuff. So, I'm calling this one as done as it's gonna get for now and I'll come back to it when I know more.

    • Nathan says:

      Aside from his informal style and a scattering of odd conversational bits, this was well worth reading. For anyone one who has raised an eyebrow at the truth claims of christianity, this book will clarify exactly why there is little veracity therein. His research is copious and his arguments well supported. For me it certainly added another nail to the coffin on this issue.

    • D.J. says:

      This book had a lot of interesting tidbits, but also has some parts hat were hard to get through. It wasn't organized very well either. Bob Price knows his stuff, but it's too bad his writing isn't as engaging as his speaking (which is fantastic).

    • Toby Vance says:

      This should be mandatory reading at any theological seminary. It seems so obvious now how the gospels were pieced together by the different factions striving to define the new religion of Christianity.

    • Clay says:

      Price argues convincingly that a critical examination of the New Testament should result in an agnostic stance on the question of whether or not there ever was a historical Jesus.This will be a great reference book for me for years to come.

    • D G says:

      Wish it had a glossary of terms in back for there were a lot of references a little more background info would have been nice for us who are not theologians. But a thorough review of the writings as they relate to the character Jesus.

    • John says:

      Good overview of current research about the validity of the gospel accounts. Not sure I agree with everything he says, but he makes some valid points, and makes you look at these documents with a new perspective.

    • Gabriel says:

      Mostly enjoyed the book, though this online critique is particularly devastating: shenvi/Essays/PriceRes

    • Claire says:

      This was a great book. A bit of a difficult read took me a long time to get through. But I learned a lot of interesting information about the origins of Christian (and Jewish) mythology.

    • Ivan says:

      An established biblical scholar that focuses on the Jesus myth with an unsquinting eye.

    • Weston says:

      Price is highly intelligent but doesn't seem to know how to write something for consumption by human beings. This is one of the densest works I've ever banged my head against.

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