Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier (The Penguin Library of American Indian History)

Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier The Penguin Library of American Indian History Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier The Penguin Library of American Indian History pp Timothy J Shannon tells the story of the most influential Native American confederacy of the col

  • Title: Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier (The Penguin Library of American Indian History)
  • Author: Timothy J. Shannon
  • ISBN: 9780670018970
  • Page: 288
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier The Penguin Library of American Indian History 260 pp Timothy J Shannon tells the story of the most influential Native American confederacy of the colonial era The Iroquois occupied a strategic region between Canada and New York and engaged in active trade and diplomacy with their colonial Dutch, French, and British neIroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier The Penguin Library of American Indian History 260 pp Timothy J Shannon tells the story of the most influential Native American confederacy of the colonial era The Iroquois occupied a strategic region between Canada and New York and engaged in active trade and diplomacy with their colonial Dutch, French, and British neighbors While they were famous as fierce warriors, it was actually their intercultural diplomacy that accounted for the span and endurance of their power in early America.By carefully maintaining their neutrality in the Anglo French imperial wars in North America, they were able to claim an unrivaled influence in colonial America at a time when other Indian nations experienced dispossession and dispersal Europeans who wanted to remain in the good graces of the Iroquois had to learn the ceremonies and the use of sacred objects that their diplomacy entailed Shannon s portrayal contradicts the notion of the noble savage, showing just how politically savvy and at times treacherous the Iroquois Nation was in the face of colonialism Keywords TIMOTHY SHANNON IROQUOIS DIPLOMACY ON EARLY AMERICAN FRONTIER PENGUIN LIBRARY AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY NATIVE AMERICAN AMERICANA

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    • Chris says:

      This is a very good history of the Native American tribes of the Iroquois Confederacy, which was originally comprised of the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, and Senecas, and later included the Tuscaroras. It covers the 17th and 18th centuries during which time European settlers were encroaching further and further into their territory in present day central New York and the Montreal area. The focus of Shannon's book is to explain how the Iroquois Confederacy, or Six Nations, interacted wit [...]

    • Scott Taylor says:

      A narrative, really a monograph, of Native American/European interactions during the 18th century. Focusing on the Iroquois and their unique brand of diplomacy. The book provides an insightful, even-handed, factual account of this time frame, while avoiding a potential downfall of interpreting or providing meta-commentary beyond the very tight focus of its subject matter. I recently read an account of an earlier time in the exploration and settlement of the northeastern parts of North America, t [...]

    • Nathan Albright says:

      The author of this book seems to assume that his listening audience will be entirely unfamiliar with the complexities of Iroquois diplomacy or with any of the most notable figures of it. I had heard of some of the people involved myself, like the illustrious Brant family, but some of the names were unfamiliar to me and would likely be unfamiliar to most readers of this book. At the heart of this book is a subtle (?) call for respect for the way in which the Iroquois were able to act like an attr [...]

    • Gary says:

      As a native of Upstate New York, I found this book to be a very interesting, very readable study of the Iroquois and their interactions with the early European settlers.

    • Ash Ryan says:

      There are two competing narratives about the Iroquois that dominate popular conceptions of them---that they were an independent and warlike people who rose up against colonial encroachments on their territory, and that they were politically advanced culture whose form of government was a major source of inspiration for the American founders. Shannon provides an evidence-based history that shows that neither of these views is particularly accurate. Far from a federalist system, the Iroquois peopl [...]

    • David Bates says:

      Timothy Shannon’s 2008 work Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier provides a picture of an Iroquois League. Persistently misunderstood as a kind of native nation state, the Iroquois League functioned foremost as a forum for the five (later six) nations of its membership to mediate disagreements and stifle the violent cycle of retribution which racked native people’s elsewhere. Formed one to two centuries after the onset of the Little Ice Age, sometime after southern migrations of [...]

    • Vilo says:

      This is a detailed account of the diplomacy practiced by Six Nations among themselves and with Europeans from the 1600's through the American Revolution. Thinking about the vast cultural differences it was amazing how often the Six Nations and the Europeans did manage to understand each other. Unfortunately from the beginning the Iroquois became dependent on European goods, which put them at a disadvantage. Incidentally, the first Europeans settling in Ohio were illegal aliens. Britain and the I [...]

    • Homer H Blass says:

      Using as a textbook in my graduate course in American Diplomatic History for the first week. I found it interesting and insightful and my students found it easier going than the other text; Schiff's account of Franklin on Paris. I would like to read or at least skim the other volumes in this Penguin series on American Indian tribes and American foreign relations. There was a related article I posted from The New York Times last week. In 2010 the Iroquois nation was invited to attend the internat [...]

    • Skuli Saeland says:

      Iroquoi indjánarnir voru voldugt bandalag indjánaþjóða í norðaustur Ameríku þegar landnám álfunnar hófst. Öfugt við aðrar indjánaþjóðir beittu þeir pólitískum klækjum í samskiptum sínum við Evrópubúa og héldu lengi vel velli m.a. með því að tefla andstæðum fylkingum gegn hvorri annarri. Það var ekki fyrr en veldi þeirra hafði hnignað í kjölfar sjálfstæðisbaráttu Bandaríkjamanna, sem virtu gerða samninga lítils, að verulega fór að síga á verri [...]

    • Amy Sturgis says:

      This is an able and concise scholarly examination of Iroquois diplomacy through the 17th and 18th centuries. As Shannon says, the Iroquois "were flesh and blood participants in a scramble for dominion in North America, and diplomacy was their tool of choice." For those who wish to understand how the Covenant Chain functioned between the Iroquois Confederacy and other Native nations, the British, and the French, this is an excellent place to start.

    • Simon says:

      Good overall. Interesting introduction to Iroquois society and the role the Six Nations played in American and Canadian History. The downside is that it's easy to loose track of the narrative because the events are so repetitive (treaty council in Montreal, treaty council in Albany, repeat as needed).

    • Jackie says:

      I learned much from this book. The chain of peace, the conflict management, the power of people in large numbers, kindness and blindness (figuratively), and the rise and fall of the Iroquois.

    • Ken Schaefer says:

      enjoyed this book and gave a counterperpective of the Iroquois Confederacy other than the one I heard about how the confederacy was a building block for American government.

    • Ex Libris says:

      Solid introduction for generalist reader

    • Ryan says:

      Evenhanded and detailed. A little Mohawk-heavy, but I think that's driven by availability of sources. The brief historiography review in the intro was informative.

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