Once Upon a Time: Forty Hungarian Folk-Tales

Once Upon a Time Forty Hungarian Folk Tales Compilation of Hungarian Folk Tales including The Rooster and the Hen The Shepherd Who Understood the Language of the Animals Wooden Peter The Student Who was Forced to be King Little Berry The Simpl

  • Title: Once Upon a Time: Forty Hungarian Folk-Tales
  • Author: Gyula Illyés Barna Balogh Ruth Sutter
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 468
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Compilation of Hungarian Folk Tales, including The Rooster and the Hen The Shepherd Who Understood the Language of the Animals Wooden Peter The Student Who was Forced to be King Little Berry The Simple Minded Bootmaker as a Miraculous Healer Long Neck, Fatty and Droopy The Flying Castle The Fox and the Wolf at the Wedding The Green Bearded King The Finch with thCompilation of Hungarian Folk Tales, including The Rooster and the Hen The Shepherd Who Understood the Language of the Animals Wooden Peter The Student Who was Forced to be King Little Berry The Simple Minded Bootmaker as a Miraculous Healer Long Neck, Fatty and Droopy The Flying Castle The Fox and the Wolf at the Wedding The Green Bearded King The Finch with the Golden Voice The Musical Silver Goat The Girl with the Beautiful Flowers Fairy Ilona and Argelus The Flute Made of Maple Wood Dear Boy The Secretive Little Boy and His Little Sword The Vain King Bendebukk Martin, the Honest Thief Tree Root, Iron Strong and Hill Roller Three Wishes The Truest Adventures of the Truthful Mountain Boy The Flower Headed Man Victor The Three Wanderers The Fish Maid The Competition of Fools King Matthias and the Old Man Goose Matt Little Kathy Free as the Wind Oh Dear What Happens to the Envious Ravenspring The Two Girls and the Iron Nose Witch Pearly Dew John The Three Golden Billy Goats The Fairy of the Three Branched Oak The Seven Ravens Kalamona and the Winds

    881 Comment

    • Angela says:

      This is a very interesting collection of Hungarian Folk Tales. Some were straightforward and felt very traditional, while others were rambling or even absurd.Actually, the most interesting part of the entire book, to me, was the eloquent preface in which Illyes explains, "What grown-ups can learn from children's books." I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in folk-lore or storytelling for the preface alone. Here is a beautiful example:"These tales, without exception, express t [...]

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