Philosophy in the Islamic World: A Very Short Introduction

Philosophy in the Islamic World A Very Short Introduction In the history of philosophy few topics are so relevant to today s cultural and political landscape as philosophy in the Islamic world Yet this remains one of the lesser known philosophical traditio

  • Title: Philosophy in the Islamic World: A Very Short Introduction
  • Author: Peter Adamson
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 437
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • In the history of philosophy, few topics are so relevant to today s cultural and political landscape as philosophy in the Islamic world Yet, this remains one of the lesser known philosophical traditions In this Very Short Introduction, Peter Adamson explores the history of philosophy among Muslims, Jews, and Christians living in Islamic lands, from its historical backgroIn the history of philosophy, few topics are so relevant to today s cultural and political landscape as philosophy in the Islamic world Yet, this remains one of the lesser known philosophical traditions In this Very Short Introduction, Peter Adamson explores the history of philosophy among Muslims, Jews, and Christians living in Islamic lands, from its historical background to thinkers in the twentieth century.Introducing the main philosophical themes of the Islamic world, Adamson integrates ideas from the Islamic and Abrahamic faiths to consider the broad philosophical questions that continue to invite debate What is the relationship between reason and religious belief What is the possibility of proving God s existence What is the nature of knowledge Drawing on the most recent research in the field, this book challenges the assumption of the cultural decline of philosophy and science in theIslamic world by demonstrating its rich heritage and overlap with other faiths and philosophies.

    364 Comment

    • Daniel Wright says:

      Trying to shelve this book by Dewey Decimal poses a peculiar challenge, largely because of that system's anachronism. Most libraries seem to put this topic under 297 - Islam, but this is incorrect. Firstly, this is philosophy, not religion, and secondly, many philosophers in the Islamic world have not even been Muslims - perhaps Maimonides is the most famous example. Clearly it most go under philosophy, but where? It is neither about philosophy generally, nor about a specific area of philosophy [...]

    • Hamdanil says:

      Concise and very accessible introduction to the topic. Covers wide range of issues and features prominent philosophers from classical to modern times. The author is very knowledgeable and respectful of the Islamic philosophers, and good at discussing the issues in an readable and entertaining, but also insightful manner.

    • C. Varn says:

      Adamson's podcasts and attempts to catalog and explicate the entire history of philosophy is incredibly fascinating and useful, and this is a wonderful, if brief addition to his work. It is, however, a whirlwind tour of Philosophy in the Islamic World including Arab Christian and diaspora Jewish philosophers. Building on both the disputes in early Arabic theology as well as building on Aristotle, one sees medieval arabic philosophy develop and somewhat predate a lot of the later medieval and ear [...]

    • Thomas says:

      This introduction is not only very short, it is also highly distilled. (Maybe that's an inept descriptor let's say instead, very condensed.) Adamson covers a lot of ground and probably leaves a lot out, but for the complete neophyte (that's me) it's a mile wide and an inch thick. I need to read it again, or better yet, pick up Adamson's Philosophy in the Islamic World -- he is a specialist in this area and it shows. Some disciplines don't benefit from the VSI approach. It's like learning how a s [...]

    • P says:

      Adamson (of Without Any Gaps fame) focuses primarily on the foundational period of philosophy in Islamicate regions. While interesting, the concepts in each field – reason contra revelation, metaphysics, the nature of time, epistemology – are easily grasped by anyone even slightly familiar with ancient and medieval Western philosophy. At times I felt as if we could just change proper nouns and see the same arguments between major Western theological figures (Mulla Sadra’s formulation of an [...]

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