Swimming With Warlords: A Dozen-Year Journey Across the Afghan War

Swimming With Warlords A Dozen Year Journey Across the Afghan War The veteran journalist and author of In the Hot Zone and The Things They Cannot Say explores the impact of than a decade of war on Afghanistan from the American invasion after to today and offe

  • Title: Swimming With Warlords: A Dozen-Year Journey Across the Afghan War
  • Author: Kevin Sites
  • ISBN: 9780062339416
  • Page: 423
  • Format: Paperback
  • The veteran journalist and author of In the Hot Zone and The Things They Cannot Say explores the impact of than a decade of war on Afghanistan, from the American invasion after 9 11 to today, and offers insights into its future and the possible consequences for the U.S.Kevin Sites made his first trip to Afghanistan in October 2001, staying 100 days to cover the U.S iThe veteran journalist and author of In the Hot Zone and The Things They Cannot Say explores the impact of than a decade of war on Afghanistan, from the American invasion after 9 11 to today, and offers insights into its future and the possible consequences for the U.S.Kevin Sites made his first trip to Afghanistan in October 2001, staying 100 days to cover the U.S invasion for NBC News On his fifth trip to the country in June 2013, Sites retraced that first odyssey, contemplating the significant events of his original trip to explore what, if anything, has changed He interviewed warlords, ex Taliban fighters, politicians, women cops and dentists, farmers, drug addicts, international aid workers, diplomats, and military personnel In Swimming with Warlords, Sites examines Afghanistan today through the prism of those two parallel journeys, exploring that nation s past and considering its future in light of the expected drawdown of U.S troops in 2014 As he tells the stories of the people he met how they have been affected by this conflict that has cost billions of dollars and thousands of lives Sites provides a fresh perspective on Afghanistan and America s role there.Swimming with Warlords contains 30 black and white photos throughout.

    347 Comment

    • Will Byrnes says:

      “If the central government doesn’t stay together,” he said, “I’ll have to find a way to protect my people.”What he said was a bad sign. “My people” in Afghanistan means one’s tribe. Very few outside of Kabul thought of themselves as citizens of the country—as Afghans.There is a lot to like in journalist Kevin Sites’s latest report from the front, Swimming with Warlords. Sites takes us from point to point on his journey through geography and history, offering a look at the A [...]

    • Shannon Wise says:

      I won this book from and am so glad I did. Kevin Sites has been to Afghanistan numerous times to report on the situation there, both militarily and for Afghans. In this book he re-traces his steps from when he visited in 2001 and 2010 to see what has changed - for better or worse. I love the style of the book, which is conversational. You get to know the people he talks about. And you get the feeling of what it is like to be in Afghanistan and the struggles that ordinary Afghans face. I think t [...]

    • Tom Landon says:

      Sites paints the most realistic portrayal of the impacts, both positive and negative, of our war in Afghanistan. I'm about halfway and am enjoying not only the stories of how we've changed the cultural landscape of Afghanistan, but also his insight into what post-American involvement Afghanistan will look like. We've sent supplies and incredible humans to try to transform their society, but are leaving with much to be done and a very uncertain future for the people there.Should be required readi [...]

    • Sean Sharp says:

      In “Swimming with Warlords”, Kevin Sites offers a personal account of two distinct, but ultimately quite similar, periods in Afghan history: the fall of the Taliban in 2001 and the withdrawal of US combat troops in 2013/14. Reporting from the frontlines during both of these tumultuous times, Sites weaves together a juxtaposing travelogue that highlights the ferocity of war verse the calmness of peace, the hospitality of the local populace verse their vigor to fight. It’s well rounded in na [...]

    • Colin says:

      A view of the Afghanistan from a journalist who was there in 2001 at the beginning of U.S. military operations and who returned in 2013 during the preparations for the U.S. military withdrawal. Well-written and engaging. What I found most interesting was the description of the "Human Terrain Teams" - HTTs - embedded teams of anthropologists helping to map and understand the social, anthropological landscape of Afghanistan, a very complex situation given the tribal and ethnic divisions in what wa [...]

    • Stan says:

      The author presents an interesting view of Afghanistan by comparing his 2001 visit with his return in 2013. While he documents a number of changes, it can't really be said that it is purely for the better. It seems that while things are better in Afghanistan now than they were under the Taliban, the US did a pretty bad job of rebuilding the country. I would recommend this one to those who have an interests in world affairs.

    • Mark Levandoski says:

      Author relates his experience of returning to Afghanistan in 2013,sometimes comparing it to previous trip in 2001. Gives a different perspective for those interested in more than just the military aspect of it, although there is some of that also. Good to round out your knowledge.

    • Elizabeth says:

      Interesting look at the war in Afghanistan from when the journalist went the first time to his fifth and last trip.

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