The World in a City: Traveling the Globe Through the Neighborhoods of the New New York

The World in a City Traveling the Globe Through the Neighborhoods of the New New York The whole world can be found in this city from the PrefaceFifty years ago New York City had only a handful of ethnic groups Today the whole world can be found within the city s five boroughs and cel

  • Title: The World in a City: Traveling the Globe Through the Neighborhoods of the New New York
  • Author: Joseph Berger
  • ISBN: 9780345487384
  • Page: 486
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The whole world can be found in this city from the PrefaceFifty years ago, New York City had only a handful of ethnic groups Today, the whole world can be found within the city s five boroughs and celebrated New York Times reporter Joseph Berger sets out to discover it, bringing alive the sights, smells, tastes, and people of the globe while taking readers on an The whole world can be found in this city from the PrefaceFifty years ago, New York City had only a handful of ethnic groups Today, the whole world can be found within the city s five boroughs and celebrated New York Times reporter Joseph Berger sets out to discover it, bringing alive the sights, smells, tastes, and people of the globe while taking readers on an intimate tour of the world s most cosmopolitan city For urban enthusiasts and armchair explorers alike, The World in a City is a look at today s polyglot and polychrome, cosmopolitan and culturally rich New York and the lessons it holds for the rest of the United States as immigration changes the face of the nation With three out of five of the city s residents either foreign born or second generation Americans, New York has become than ever a collection of villages virtually self reliant hamlets, each exquisitely textured by its particular ethnicities, history, and politics For the price of a subway ride, you can visit Ghana, the Philippines, Ecuador, Uzbekistan, and Bangladesh As Berger shows us in this absorbing and enlightening tour, New York is an endlessly fascinating crossroads Naturally, tears exist in this colorful social fabric the controversy over Korean language shop signs in tony Douglaston, Queens the uneasy proximity of traditional cottages and new McMansions built by recently arrived Russian residents of Manhattan Beach, Brooklyn Yet in spite of the tensions among neighbors, what Berger has found most miraculous about New York is how the city and its than eight million denizens can adapt to and even embrace change like no other place on earth, from the former pushcart knish vendor on the Lower East Side who now caters to his customers via the Internet, to the recent migr s from former Soviet republics to Brooklyn s Brighton Beach and Midwood whose arrival saved New York s furrier trade from certain extinction Like the place it chronicles, The World in a City is an engaging hybrid Blending elements of sociology, pop culture, and travel writing, this is the rare book that enlightens readers while imbuing them with the hope that even in this increasingly fractious and polarized world, we can indeed co exist in harmony.

    453 Comment

    • John says:

      If you're familiar with New York City, you'll recognize what a truly impressive job Berger's done profiling changes in several neighborhoods over the past generation. If not, his portayals of life outside the more touristy areas should give an appreciation of how diverse life there can be. At first, I was tempted to skip around with the order in which I read the essays; however, it became clear that they've been arranged as they are so that the parts make a well-put-together whole. Highly recomm [...]

    • Chris says:

      If you ever want to understand the change culture and immigration trends that New York and its suburbs have been through this is the book to read to learn and study all that. The author takes you on this amazing historical journey through each major neighborhood in New York so you can understand what it was before and what it as turned into today. The sad thing that is that the author made a point in saying that despite all his incredible researching and interviewing in each neighborhood, it wil [...]

    • Michael Lewyn says:

      Each chapter in this book profiles a different neighborhood that has been transformed over the past few decades - in most cases, by the "new immigration" from Latin America, Asia, and even Africa (though Berger also discusses a couple of newly-gentrifying areas and the Orthodox Judaism that now dominates Midwood).As a new resident of NYC, I got some ideas about places to visit; in fact, this morning I visited the Bukharan Jewish Center, the opulent Bukharan synagogue in Forest Hills that Berger [...]

    • Nicole Smith says:

      This book jumped out at me from a travel guide shelf. I wish I had read it about five years ago - or rather I wish it had been published more recently. Reading about all these neighborhoods that are at arms length for me right now made me want to go explore them all. However, the too true observation that New York City is a place that is ever changing place was a little off the mark with the added prediction that the book would be outdated in 20 years. Less than 10 years later I know a couple of [...]

    • Rachelle Rae says:

      If you are a New York Cityophile like myself, you will love this book. Berger takes you on a journey through some of New York's swiftly changing, far flung and not so far flung neighborhoods. The journey he takes the reader on is based on interviews with resident, observations of street life, memories of his own life growing up in the city, and larger ones of the collective city history. At the end of each neighborhood chapter he lists suggested places to go visit and eat in the neighborhoods he [...]

    • Benjamin says:

      A pretty engaging look at New York and its ethnic past and future. It really nails down the nostalgia with which people (especially from the outside) regard the city, the identification of things lost, the collective suffering and achievement. Also identifies the new wave of immigration that is changing the city so radically, as well as the economic effects of the real estate boom (although it will be interesting to see what the popped bubble effect will be). I was annoyed at Berger's insistence [...]

    • Melissa says:

      Such a sweet collection of NYC immigrant and neighborhood stories. Berger takes you to neighborhoods well known, like Chinatown, or lesser-known, like Gerritsen Beach, and shares stories of people who once lived there or currently live there, and also paints a picture of what life is like. Berger is a journalist, so the chapters read more like essays, with the (to-be-expected) insertion of his opinion here and there. I didn't really like the profile on Norwood (his thesis wasn't all there, and h [...]

    • D.G. says:

      **2.5 Stars**I thought this book was going to be different. The 'Traveling the Globe' part of the subtitle gave me the impression that this book would tell me about all the different cultures in NY and which neighborhood I should go if I wanted to get a taste of it.To be truthful there was a bit of that, but the book was inundated with nostalgia. Most chapters were about elderly people complaining about the way things it used to be and how the neighborhood had changed. This was BORING. I think I [...]

    • Beth says:

      Lots of great stories about New York. For a reporter for what my partner calls the "belly button paper" (New York Times), he's pretty careful to notice the good, the bad, and the ugly in his hometown. My only quibble is he seems a bit less comfortable with black people (esp. black people born in the U.S. versus African and Caribbean immigrants)--that is, talking to and about black people--than with other people of color, and he ought not to be, considering he's a New Yorker born of poor Jewish i [...]

    • Scott says:

      An insight into ny that I was craving. Although it was tedious at times, it still reassured me that not all of ny can be rough, and that although it is a diverse city to say the least, it is still a melting pot and second generation immigrants integrate. Can't wait to live there and try all the restaurants and barbers listed.

    • Flora says:

      Charming! Also, a helpful window into neighborhood trends. It's amazing how much has changed even in the four years between this book's publication and the time I started reading it. ("Greece is a rich country now!" someone crowed in Astoria. I just can't get that out of my mind.)

    • Sarah says:

      I loved this book! Shame that I discovered it so late, as it's almost 10 years old now. I was surprised to see how quickly neighborhoods were changing at that time. Also great for providing context and history to the areas I live near.

    • Erin says:

      I'm excited about this- it's about a lot of outer neighborhoods and their constituents, how the immigrant experience is so different than it used to be, and how the city has changed and/or stayed the same. I've read 2 chapters and already love it!

    • Anne says:

      I gave this book a try - I started from the beginning, skipped around, read the end in an attempt to find some meat to this book. There is none. It's all New York tourism fluff. So sad - it had so much potential!

    • Mike says:

      Great and informative book on some of the neighborhoods in New York City.

    • Summer says:

      So many must-visit places in this book! The history of some of NYC's neighborhoods is pretty cool, too.

    • Florence says:

      A unique look at New York's neigborhoods today.

    • Beth Harper says:

      Learned a lot about oft-overlooked communities in New York City.

    • J.P. says:

      A little dry, but Berger has clearly done tons of research and puts together some interesting profiles of different immigrants all over the city.

    • Kirby says:

      Part of my new quest to reframe my Brooklyn-centric world view . . .

    • Lefluf says:

      Absolute must-read if you live in New York - any of the boroughs will do. Terrific book by a swell guy.

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