Die Kindheit Jesu

Die Kindheit Jesu J M Coetzees gro er Roman Die Kindheit Jesu ist ein Meteor voller Intensit t berraschung und Sch nheit Emigration Einsamkeit das R tsel einer Ankunft In einem fremden Land finden sich ein Mann und

  • Title: Die Kindheit Jesu
  • Author: J.M. Coetzee
  • ISBN: 9783100108258
  • Page: 435
  • Format: Hardcover
  • J M Coetzees gro er Roman Die Kindheit Jesu ist ein Meteor voller Intensit t, berraschung und Sch nheit Emigration, Einsamkeit, das R tsel einer Ankunft In einem fremden Land finden sich ein Mann und ein Junge wieder, wo sie ohne Erinnerung ihr Leben neu erfinden m ssen Sie m ssen nicht nur eine neue Sprache lernen, sondern auch dem Jungen eine Mutter suchen InJ M Coetzees gro er Roman Die Kindheit Jesu ist ein Meteor voller Intensit t, berraschung und Sch nheit Emigration, Einsamkeit, das R tsel einer Ankunft In einem fremden Land finden sich ein Mann und ein Junge wieder, wo sie ohne Erinnerung ihr Leben neu erfinden m ssen Sie m ssen nicht nur eine neue Sprache lernen, sondern auch dem Jungen eine Mutter suchen In einem dunklen Glas spiegelt J M Coetzee unsere Welt, so dass sich alles Nebens chliche unseres Umgangs verliert und die elementarsten Gesten sichtbar werden.

    110 Comment

    • José Toledo says:

      I am not much given to write book reviews because, as the saying goes, birds do not make good ornithologists. But with the publication of J. M. Coetzee's latest novel, The Childhood of Jesus (Harvill Secker, London; Viking, New York) I am moved to address the issue of reader engagement or, shall we say, responsibility. That responsibility begins by reading a work of fiction on its own terms. That is, with an open mind. Professional reviewers have been put off by the apparent strangeness of this [...]

    • Stephen P says:

      We have all felt that exalted state when a writer seems to write specifically for us. That is part of why I read, I am an exalted state junkie. J.M. Coetzee has been that for me. He took particular care through, Elizabeth Costello, Slow Man, Diary of a Bad Year, to carve these particular novels to my taste. Even books of his that I didn't like, I liked due to the elegance of his authorial voice. So, when, The Childhood of Jesus arrived from amazon, since my hands tend to shake a little, I asked [...]

    • Hugh says:

      This was my first Coetzee for several years - the last new one I read was Diary of a Bad Year, and at that time his new books seemed very gloomy and introspective. So thanks are due to the 21st Century Literature group for selecting this as one of this month's group reads.This one seems on the surface to be a simple fable. Simon has arrived in a Spanish-speaking country across the ocean and is accompanied by a small boy David who has lost his parents and his identity documents at sea. It is soon [...]

    • Roland says:

      He sits down to create another world. He takes the real world and strips it of all the things that are not required just as he has stripped language of all that is not required, just as he has stripped narrative technique down to third-person I-narrators, even in his own diaries.We are left with the bones of narrative, the bones of language, the bones of a world. The reduction is clever. For instance, to reduce language even further, we must know that all the characters conduct their (partly hig [...]

    • Leah says:

      A hollow eggWhen I was young, Easter eggs were a double treat. There was milk chocolate on the outside and then, when the egg was opened, there was an extra something inside, a small packet of Maltesers, Chocolate Buttons or, for the really lucky, Smarties. (Of course, note well that the Easter egg was also an allusion to the story of Christ.) What Coetzee has given us here is a hollow egg – and one that is, like this introduction, candy-coated with a thick layer of contrived and unsubtle symb [...]

    • Jonathan says:

      There are moments in this novel when I felt that perhaps, at last, something interesting might be said. But it was not to be. There is not a single original bone in its body. Trite, derivative and devoid of true depth. Imagine a Saramago novel with all of the genius sucked out. If this was by an unknown writer I may have stretched to two stars for some of the pages, but as I know what he is capable of, he gets one star and an F- in big red pen.

    • Katherine says:

      The best kind of parable is one that can convey its meaning through its simplest reading while harbouring depths into which the reader can dive deeper and deeper without ever reaching a hard and fast 'moral' at the bottom. For me, what makes 'The Childhood of Jesus' seem such a feat is the great complexity of thought it provokes through the telling of a relatively straight forward (but very moving) story, exploring ideas of morality without preaching or passing judgement.The novel follows a boy, [...]

    • Rebecca Foster says:

      This had been sitting around on my shelves for years. I read the first chapter and then quickly skimmed the rest; I found it unutterably dull. It wouldn’t be fair of me to give a rating given that I barely glanced at the book, but I’ll just say that it would take me a lot of secondary source reading to try to understand what was going on here, and it’s not made me look forward to trying more from Coetzee (especially not the presumed sequel, The Schooldays of Jesus, from the Booker longlist [...]

    • Simona says:

      Sau: de ce nu te iubeşte lumea atunci când eşti altfel şi te răzvrăteşti împotriva regulilor ei.Cartea asta e o surpriză incredibilă. Cred că m-am îndrăgostit iremediabil de Coetzee:„Sperasem ca volumul să apara cu o copertă goală şi o pagină de titlu goală, pentru ca abia după lectura ultimei pagini cititorul să dea peste titlu, ”Copilăria lui Isus”. Dar în industria editorială, după cum se prezintă la ora actuală, aşa ceva nu este permis.“ (J. M. Coetzee)

    • Teresa Proença says:

      Será uma falta de respeito dizer que um livro, escrito por um Nobel da literatura, é uma grande porcaria? Mas é o que me ocorre pensar de um livro que fala tanto de cócó; desde desentupimento de sanitas, a conselhos para não comer carne de porco, porque os referidos animais comem cócó e, por isso, "A carne de porco é carne de cócó."Piadinhas de mau gosto à parte, confesso que não achei qualquer interesse nesta obra, sendo o mais provável que eu não tenha entendido a mensagem que l [...]

    • Tanuj Solanki says:

      Two stars only because of the suspicion that I must have missed something grave in the text - because it's Coetzee for God's sake. Very shockingly bad! If he'd written if before the Nobel, the committee would've had second thoughts.Read Disgrace and Life and times of Michael K - avoid this.

    • Donato says:

      Well well well, what do we have here. Some sort of abstract allegory? A parable (or series of parables)? An anti-philosophy rant? A pro-philosophy rant? What is the nature of this book?, the book itself practically begs us to ask.What is the nature of nature, what does it mean to live in this world,_how_ do you live in this world. At times, the book seems to be a series of abstract, conceptual, philosophical conversations [1]. But there's a story, too: a strange, inexplicable story of a man (Sim [...]

    • Max Nemtsov says:

      Проснувшись однажды утром после беспокойного сна, Магнус Миллз обнаружил, что он у себя в постели превратился во Франца Кафку. Лежа на панцирнотвердой спине, он решил написать роман Жозе Сарамаго. Вот что у него получилось.А если шутки в сторону, то это роман-притча, обманчи [...]

    • jeremy says:

      john maxwell's books have become increasingly more enigmatic over the past decade, frustrating both critics and fans alike. whereas the early works of the south african nobel laureate are marked by post-colonial violence, the injustices of apartheid, the cascading effects of history, and defiance of institutional rule, his later efforts have trended more towards the philosophical than the overtly political. coetzee's output over the past decade, including elizabeth costello, slow man, diary of a [...]

    • Lisa says:

      When Simon is teaching 6-year old David, a refugee to Novilla along with Simon, to read Simon reproaches David that he must submit to what is on the page, not fill it in with his own fantasies. That he must not just look at the pictures and then guess at the story. David, ever petulant, ever adverse to any reasoning but his own, rebels against this method. What is Coetzee getting at here? If he is advising us as readers to submit to what is on his page, what part? The title? David shares affinit [...]

    • Tony says:

      THE CHILDHOOD OF JESUS. (2013). J. M. Coetzee. ***.I have to admit that if this book had been written by anyone else besides Coetzee, I would have put it down early on. As it was, I’m not sure I got the point of it at all. Where the title came from I have no clue. It’s the story of a young boy who is traveling to a new land on a ship who gets separated from his mother – who was apparently traveling separately. He had a note on where and how to find her, but the note got lost during the voy [...]

    • Aseem Kaul says:

      Coetzee's new novel, The Childhood of Jesus (though I can't help thinking The Childhood of Wittgenstein would be more accurate) is both an intensely fascinating and a deeply frustrating book. Fascinating because it is set in a nameless country that is half Paradise, half Saramagian bureaucracy, a land at once eerily familiar and governed by a bland illogic all its own; because it is a novel shot through with ideas, with endless variations on the essential duality of human existence, the contrast [...]

    • Jenny says:

      Coetzee is a writer I will always come back to, every turn he took in his writing so far: I will gladly follow. However: this one I just couldn't get into. Surprisingly dull and full of narrative traps which he seems to have laid out for himself (he's Coetzee, so he knows how to solve them somehow, it just really doesn't help the book). I can't seem to get a grasp on what it's about in essence and while sometimes I can find that quite intriguing if there's something that resonates with me, in th [...]

    • Ravi Gangwani says:

      The most shocking betrayal of all time This was all I have to say on this.I really doubt that this has been written by the same writer who has written legendary work like 'Life and Times of Micheal K', 'Youth', 'Disgrace', and 'Boyhood'.Throughout my reading I was pondering on is it the same Coetzee to whom I adore so much has penned his energy into this book ?I was so much attracted to the title that it made my expectation very high, but sadly it was no where close to Coetzee's previous work.I [...]

    • LindaJ^ says:

      I nominated this book for the March monthly read of the 21st Century Literature GR group as Coetzee is a Nobel prize winning author, I enjoyed two of his other books (Disgrace and Slow Man), this book has been on my shelf for a couple of years, and the Group has not previously read any of his work. To my surprize it won the voting and I agreed to moderate the group read. This caused me to read it in advance so I could be prepared for the group read. The story takes place, for the most part, in a [...]

    • Aries Poon says:

      J.M. Coetzee, the first two-time winner of the Booker Prize and a literature Nobel laureate, is getting odder and more obscure. Reading his latest novel The Childhood of Jesus, I felt like being led by a highly acclaimed tour guide into a dark forest, and we were both lost.Literary critics dare not to be too harsh, because it's Coetzee we are talking about. Many of them did say the plot was mysterious and it wasn't clear how the child David was an allegory of Jesus. One of them even conceded she [...]

    • Chris Dietzel says:

      This was the only remaining work of fiction by Coetzee that I hadn't read--due entirely to the fact the book is out of print and I couldn't find a copy until buying one for $0.50 at a library book sale (it made my day). I went into this really wishing the title had been different since it's not a story of the childhood of Jesus. Instead, it's a modern story of a boy who can't fit in because he thinks in different ways than everyone around him. As I went on, though, I found myself appreciating th [...]

    • Jill says:

      This was my first book by Coetzee, and I found it to be bleak & mysterious yet strangely beautiful. Looking forward to The Schooldays of Jesus.

    • Krista says:

      It is as if the numbers were islands floating in a great black sea of nothingness, and he were each time being asked to close his eyes and launch himself across the void. What if I fall?— that is what he asks himself. What if I fall and then keep falling for ever? Lying in bed in the middle of the night, I could sometimes swear that I too was falling — falling under the same spell that grips the boy. If getting from one to two is so hard, I asked myself, how shall I ever get from zero to one [...]

    • Xenja says:

      Una piccola città portuale, Novilla, di un paese senza nome, accoglie innumerevoli profughi che hanno attraversato l'oceano per cominciare una nuova vita. Letteralmente: ai profughi viene imposto di dimenticare tutto il loro passato, perfino il loro nome. Gli viene data una nuova identità, una nuova data di nascita, una nuova lingua da imparare, e gli viene data assistenza; gli viene assegnato un appartamento, e ricevono tanti servizi gratuiti. Tornare indietro è proibito. Il paese senza nome [...]

    • Paolo says:

      Un uomo di mezza età accudisce un bimbo di cinque anni al suo arrivo in una città (Novilla) dove si parla spagnolo. Arrivano da un campo profughi dopo un tragitto in nave. Del loro passato non ricordano nemmeno più i loro nomi, gliene sono stati dati di nuovi al loro arrivo.Vengono presi in carico dall'apparato assistenziale di Novilla, frugalissimo ma a suo modo efficiente.Al tutore del bambino (sensibilissimo e capriccioso) viene anche dato un alloggio gratuito ed un lavoro, faticoso per qu [...]

    • Benny says:

      Lees dit boek en al je vragen zullen beantwoord worden. Binnen het universum van J.M. Coetzee studeren stuwadoors filosofie en vragen ze zich tussen sjouwen en houwen door of zoiets mogelijk dan wel wenselijk is. Een sluitend antwoord krijgt de vraag niet, en gelukkig maar.De kinderjaren van Jezus is een vreemd boek. Het verhaal gaat over een anonieme vluchteling (laten we hem Simon noemen) die op zoek gaat naar een (de?) moeder voor “een interessant kind” waar hij zich tijdens zijn tocht ov [...]

    • Shashi Martynova says:

      Very shrewd and deft thing, this novel, with sharp-pointed voice and poker face. There's a sense, that the author made the universe with much much more to weave into it (meaning not "saying more", but in much more intricate detail), though I can't appreciate enough the crystal lucidity of the style chosen, and with this style it's very easy to stray into enthalled dive of minutae of this queer and sometimes eerie utopia.And yes, author's tongue-in-cheek is nothing but charming.

    • LunaBel says:

      THe Childhood of Jesus  Simon and David come to Novilla by boat in order to start a new life and speak Spanish. Simon is a man in his forties, he does not know exactly his age, and David is a child Simon meets in the boat. Even though Simon does not know David he decides to help him survive and find his mother. David had  a letter which explains who he is and who his mother is, but he loses it in the boat, as it seems that in the boat, all the memories are lost. Simon stays true to his promis [...]

    • Trish says:

      This strange and absorbing fiction from Nobel Prize winner Coetzee has a post-apocalyptic feel. We meet a five-year-old boy, David, and a man, Simón, who have been given names as part of their relocation from where and to where, we never learn. We know only that they are refugees and that they stayed some time in a camp called Belstar where they learned Spanish in preparation for their move by boat to Novilla. People in Novilla can’t remember the past and appear to have no curiosity about it. [...]

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