Baby Bust

Baby Bust Lean in Opt out Have it all None of the above A new book based on a groundbreaking cross generational study reveals both greater freedom and new constraints for men and women in their work and family

  • Title: Baby Bust
  • Author: Stewart D. Friedman
  • ISBN: 9781613630341
  • Page: 479
  • Format: Paperback
  • Lean in Opt out Have it all None of the above.A new book based on a groundbreaking cross generational study reveals both greater freedom and new constraints for men and women in their work and family lives.Stew Friedman, founding director of The Wharton School s Work Life Integration Project, studied two generations of Wharton college students as they graduated Gen XerLean in Opt out Have it all None of the above.A new book based on a groundbreaking cross generational study reveals both greater freedom and new constraints for men and women in their work and family lives.Stew Friedman, founding director of The Wharton School s Work Life Integration Project, studied two generations of Wharton college students as they graduated Gen Xers in 1992 and Millennials in 2012 The cross generational study produced a stark discovery the rate of graduates who plan to have children has dropped by nearly half over the past 20 years At the same time, men and women are now aligned in their attitudes about dual career relationships, and they are opting out of parenthood in equal proportions But their reasons for doing so are quite different.In his new book, Baby Bust New Choices for Men and Women in Work and Family, Friedman draws on this unique research to explain why so many young people are not planning to become parents He reveals good news, that there is a greater freedom of choice now, and bad, that new constraints are limiting people s options In light of these present realities, he offers ideas for what we can do as a society, in our organizations, and for ourselves to make it easier for men and women to choose the lives they want.In this book, Friedman addresses How views about work and family have changed in the past 20 years Why men and women have different reasons for opting out of parenthood How family has been redefined Why we are all now part of a revolution in work and family What choices we face in our social and educational policy How organizations and individuals especially men can spur cultural changeIn the debates on work and family, people of all generations are calling for a reasoned, thoughtful, research driven contribution to the discussion In Baby Bust, Friedman offers just that an astute assessment of how far we have come and where we need to go from here.

    604 Comment

    • Eva says:

      Some interesting findings, but mostly this should have been a series of bullet points summarizing the study results, not a full-fledged book.Some kindle quotes:In our sample, the rate of college graduates who plan to have children has dropped by about half over the past 20 years. In 1992, 78 percent said that they planned to have children. In 2012, 42 percent did. And these percentages were nearly the same for men and women. Millennial men and women are opting out of parenthood in equal proporti [...]

    • Jeff says:

      Audiobook. Interesting book with some good research done. Shorter than I thought it would be.

    • Christina Boyle says:

      Professor Friedman would make an excellent women's group speaker in a corporate atmosphere. His social policy suggestions were helpful:* Provide world class child care;* Make family leave available;* Revise the education calendar - other industrial and Western countries have children in school for longer days and for a greater part of the calendar year;* Support portable healthcare - ACA will help!;* Relieve students of burdensome debt - won't happen. Our schools are a reflection of our retail e [...]

    • Valerie young says:

      inpowerwomen/stay-at-hJust discovered this review of Baby Bust by Vincent O'Keefe. If women stop having children, of even just have only one, the economic consequences will be cataclysmic. Biblical, even! You'd think as a society we'd be motivated to promote having babies, by re-assuring parents that doing so wouldn't plunge them into a precarious position financially.

    • Eduardo says:

      Interesting stats and commentary about the differences in the Wharton classes of 1992 and 2012 when it comes to their plans for long-term relationships and children.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *