Sonic Wonderland: A Scientific Odyssey of Sound

Sonic Wonderland A Scientific Odyssey of Sound As an acoustic engineer Trevor Cox has spent his career eradicating unwanted noises echoes in concert halls clamour in classrooms Until the day he heard something so astonishing that he had an epiph

  • Title: Sonic Wonderland: A Scientific Odyssey of Sound
  • Author: Trevor J. Cox
  • ISBN: 9781448114573
  • Page: 209
  • Format: ebook
  • As an acoustic engineer, Trevor Cox has spent his career eradicating unwanted noises echoes in concert halls, clamour in classrooms Until the day he heard something so astonishing that he had an epiphany rather than quashing rare or bizarre sounds, we should be celebrating these sonic treasures.This is the story of his investigation into the mysteries of these Sonic WoAs an acoustic engineer, Trevor Cox has spent his career eradicating unwanted noises echoes in concert halls, clamour in classrooms Until the day he heard something so astonishing that he had an epiphany rather than quashing rare or bizarre sounds, we should be celebrating these sonic treasures.This is the story of his investigation into the mysteries of these Sonic Wonders of the World In the Mojave Desert he finds sand dunes that sing In France he discovers an echo that tells jokes In California he drives down a musical road that plays the William Tell Overture In Cathedrals across the world he learns how acoustics changed the history of the Church.Touching on physics, music, archaeology, neuroscience, biology, and design, Cox explains how sound is made and altered by the environment and how our body reacts to peculiar noises from the exotic sonic wonders he encounters on his journey, or the equally unique and surprising sounds of our everyday environment.In a world dominated by the visual, Sonic Wonderland encourages us to become better listeners and to open our ears to the glorious cacophony around us Listen to a selection of astonishing sounds here soundcloud sonicwonderland

    845 Comment

    • Paul says:

      We are surrounded by sounds and noise, some of it good, like the song of a bird, but a lot of it bad like the hammer of a road drill. In the book, Cox is seeking out some of the natural and non natural sounds that we come across every day.He visits locations all across the work in this book, from the natural caves and amphitheatres that have natural echoes and reverbs to the singing desserts in the Mojave dessert and the tidal bore of the river Severn. There are noises that that humans have crea [...]

    • Mandy says:

      Trevor Cox is an acoustic engineer and his passion for sounds of all kinds comes over loud and clear in this fascinating exploration of some of the sonic wonders of the world and the mysterious sounds that the natural world often produces. He points out that sound is often ignored or blocked out when it becomes a nuisance but in fact we should pay attention and celebrate sound and thus become better listeners. His study is wide-ranging and covers a wealth of topics, from physics to music to neur [...]

    • Tom says:

      Outstanding piece of popular science writing. Describes how things sound (and feel) beautifully, using some evocative examples and stories. Good to have them available online to listen to (sonicwonders) but the descriptions are so precise, they're almost not needed.I thought he got the tone just right - entertaining and on the light side but with enough technical, acoustic and musical detail to guide readers who wish to learn more.

    • J.P. Turner says:

      An enjoyable read for all of us sound and music geeks out there. Professor Cox's explains the science of sound and acoustics in a way which is interesting, easily understandable and non-patronising. I know a little bit about this stuff but it was a nice refresher. Seemed a bit dry at times but it is a science book. Definitely provides food for thought and I'm glad I finally found time to read it.

    • Tara Brabazon says:

      I was waiting to be thrilled by this book. I am underwhelmed. There is attention to acoustics, resonance and reverberation. But I am uncertain about the argument. Description is evocative. Analysis is undercooked. This book has potential. But the powerful nature of the sonic media field requires a bang rather than a murmur from new books.

    • Raven says:

      + A really interesting read on sound that explores how sound affects us through architecture and history+ starts slow but gets pretty interesting fro. the second chapter - occasionally yearns too much for the past- does try to explain the science of sound, but assumes that one has some physics knowledge; but these sections can be easily skimmed

    • Carol Ferro says:

      A thoroughly interesting book about sound in different environments, structures and eras. I would love to listen to an audiobook version to hear the effects that are so beautifully described.

    • Science For The People says:

      Featured on Science for the People show #269 on June 13, 2014, during an interview with author Trevor Cox. scienceforthepeople/epi

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