Browsing Nature's Aisles: A Year of Foraging for Wild Food in the Suburbs

Browsing Nature s Aisles A Year of Foraging for Wild Food in the Suburbs When most of us think of self sufficiency we think of growing a large garden and maybe keeping a few chickens for eggs or meat While this is certainly part of the picture unless you live on a large

  • Title: Browsing Nature's Aisles: A Year of Foraging for Wild Food in the Suburbs
  • Author: Eric Brown Wendy Brown
  • ISBN: 9780865717503
  • Page: 112
  • Format: Paperback
  • When most of us think of self sufficiency, we think of growing a large garden, and maybe keeping a few chickens for eggs or meat While this is certainly part of the picture, unless you live on a large acreage or happen to be a permaculture god or goddess, it is unlikely that it will be enough to allow you to completely break free from the corporate food machine Wild foodWhen most of us think of self sufficiency, we think of growing a large garden, and maybe keeping a few chickens for eggs or meat While this is certainly part of the picture, unless you live on a large acreage or happen to be a permaculture god or goddess, it is unlikely that it will be enough to allow you to completely break free from the corporate food machine Wild foods are the ideal solution to bridging the gap between what you are able to produce to feed yourself and what your family needs to survive.Browsing Nature s Aisles is the story of one suburban family s adventures in wild foraging As part of their commitment to self reliance and resiliency, Wendy and Eric Brown decided to spend a year incorporating wild foods as a regular part of their diet The experience fundamentally changed their definition of food Not only did they learn about specific flora and fauna, but they also had to learn how to prepare them in ways that would be both aesthetically appealing and palatable.With information on collecting, preparing, and preserving easily identifiable wild edibles found in most suburban landscapes, this unique and inspiring guide is a must read for anyone who wants to enhance their family s food security by availing themselves of the cornucopia on their doorstep.Wendy Brown and Eric Brown are suburban homesteaders growing roots both literally and figuratively in southern Maine They have been studying wild edibles for many years Wendy is also the author of Surviving the Apocalypse in the Suburbs.

    407 Comment

    • Hilary says:

      This book reminds us that food grows all around us if we just know where to look, and you don't have to be desperate or off-the-grid to make that choice. Anyone who's ever gone berrying is a forager - be proud! The author (and his wife) are not Tom & Barbara from "The Good Life", just normal people trying to eat good, safe food and learn more about their area in the process.They had simple goals: to harvest one item a week, to learn how to store what they foraged, to track the foraged amount [...]

    • Jennifer Lavoie says:

      This book was nothing like I thought it would be; it ended up being just as great, though in a different way than I was expecting. When I had first received the book, I was expecting a guide to help me begin my own foraging. This is not the book for that. Instead, the book outlines the Brown family's reasons for foraging, their successes and failures, and what they've done with what they foraged. The book also deals with the rising price of food and how the act of foraging can help supplement th [...]

    • Dana says:

      Well-written, and interesting, this book tells about one family's quest to learn more about foraging and eating wild foods. After many years of research and growing their own foods at home, they spent one year incorporating foraged foods into at least one meal a week. The book is well-researched and explains that if one is going to eat foraged foods, you should check at least three sources to make sure that what you are eating is what you think it is and that it is not poisonous, that you should [...]

    • Rosanita says:

      Wendy and Eric Brown decided to forage for food. They didn't do it as some type of fad, but because of health reports of our food system and their daughter's fear of being hurt by the modified foods and their containers in the grocery store. When I first read the premise of their true story, I was a little skeptical. What kind of crazy person goes foraging, right? Were they some type of survivalist nut jobs? Turns out they weren't so crazy after all. While reading this, I started thinking back t [...]

    • Anastacia says:

      When I first requested this book to read through netgalley, I thought it was going to be more of a how-to guide. Getting into gardening more and more - and canning, and freezing my garden goodies, and preserving, and probably dehydrating as well next spring, I was thrilled at the idea of reading about foraging. I did a little of that this year, digging up and using lots of wild garlic that's been growing on my parents property for as long as I can remember, and hearing stories of my family eatin [...]

    • Larae says:

      Ingesting subject but it needed some much stronger editing!

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *