Wishing for Snow: A Memoir

Wishing for Snow A Memoir In this brave and beautifully composed tribute to her mother Minrose Gwin accomplishes something rare in the craft of the memoir not merely a record of a devastating mother daughter relationship but

  • Title: Wishing for Snow: A Memoir
  • Author: Minrose Gwin
  • ISBN: 9780807129289
  • Page: 274
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In this brave and beautifully composed tribute to her mother, Minrose Gwin accomplishes something rare in the craft of the memoir not merely a record of a devastating mother daughter relationship but a redemptive act of artistic witness as well In telling the story of her mentally ill poet mother, Erin Taylor Clayton Pitner, Gwin looks backward and forward at a southernIn this brave and beautifully composed tribute to her mother, Minrose Gwin accomplishes something rare in the craft of the memoir not merely a record of a devastating mother daughter relationship but a redemptive act of artistic witness as well In telling the story of her mentally ill poet mother, Erin Taylor Clayton Pitner, Gwin looks backward and forward at a southern family, linking personal and cultural malaise while also attempting to envision the person her mother longed to be, the woman Gwin never knew Erin Taylor wasn t always crazy Her childhood diary from 1930 reveals a cheerful, observant Mississippi girl who steadfastly wished for snow, though usually it didn t come And when it came it didn t stick From a dreamy college student to a young divorced mother who then remarried, grew middle aged, and began to write and publish poetry, Erin Taylor spiraled deeper and deeper into the psychosis that eventually defined her existence until her death from ovarian cancer Gwin searches for her mother amid the poetry, letters, recipes, traffic tickets, newspaper clippings, medical reports, and quixotic lists left behind With humor, intrigue, and sadness, her compelling memo

    595 Comment

    • Maya says:

      I read this because the author was my college mentor. I found it fascinating because I knew her--I don't know if it would have been as compelling without that connection, though I can't really remember much about the book now.

    • Leigh Hancock says:

      Gwin's memoir about her crazy mother (whom she commits more than once) is really a form-meets-content exploration of grief and guilt. And like grief, it doesn't progress logically through time; it's disorderly, rambling, funny, frustrating and acute. In the first paragraph alone the narrator moves from herself to her mother to her mother's birth which occurs at the time of day when "overripe figs tremble and slip to earth without a sound." Still in the same paragraph, we hear about yellow jacket [...]

    • Gail says:

      Actually, I think I'd give this book 2 and a half stars. The story itself was interesting, about the author's mother and how her progressively worse mental illness affected her family. Her mother was also a poet, and many of the poems are included in the book. However, I often found Gwin's writing style distracting. It's hard to follow a sentence when it's an entire paragraph long! So, I guess I'd give this a "thumbs up," albeit with some reservations.

    • Lisa says:

      Ufda. Tough book for me to get through. Just not a good fit for me, i guess!

    • Micaela says:

      sad. intense. necessary. it matters to talk about this subject and this author does so in a painfully honest and beautiful way.

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