The Voice of the Butterfly: A Novel

The Voice of the Butterfly A Novel Now in paperback John Nichols s fresh hilarious and touching novel brings his vintage wit to the absurdities of modern life When Suicide City s new highway bypass threatens the home of an exquisite

  • Title: The Voice of the Butterfly: A Novel
  • Author: John Nichols
  • ISBN: 9780811839907
  • Page: 449
  • Format: Paperback
  • Now in paperback, John Nichols s fresh, hilarious, and touching novel brings his vintage wit to the absurdities of modern life When Suicide City s new highway bypass threatens the home of an exquisitely obscure butterfly, aging 60s radical and continuing proponent of losing battles Charley McFarland rallies an off the rails band of misfits to help fight the powers that bNow in paperback, John Nichols s fresh, hilarious, and touching novel brings his vintage wit to the absurdities of modern life When Suicide City s new highway bypass threatens the home of an exquisitely obscure butterfly, aging 60s radical and continuing proponent of losing battles Charley McFarland rallies an off the rails band of misfits to help fight the powers that be A dazzling dark comedy of ideals and unlikely heroes, his latest novel will delight fans of his Milagro Beanfield War and of Nichols s unique style Raise the toughest questions you can think of, but keep the readers laughing Denver Post.

    395 Comment

    • Corey says:

      "The Voice of the Butterfly shows that Nichols has not lost his taste for satire nor his anger at the continuing destruction of the Earth. While the New Mexico trilogy had flights of craziness, Butterfly finds Nichols in full-on Tom Robbins mode, spewing forth sentences of breathtaking insanity and wordplay. You have to have a love of over-the-top writing to fully appreciate this novel, but if you are thus equipped, you are in for one hell of a treat. A bizarre, hilarious, profane, and tremendou [...]

    • Georgia says:

      The Voice of the Butterfly was certainly a unique read, but definitely not my favorite actually I didn't like it at ALL. Although the plot had potential to be really inspiring, the book was so over the top and crazy, that I felt like the importance of the serious themes were lost. The book's potential brilliance was lost in its wacky and overwhelming characters and writing style. Maybe for some people this would be a better book, but for me bluck. Not my cup of tea at all.

    • Patrick Gibson says:

      I have often made the pilgrimage to the town that inspired The Milagro Beanfield War. The town and the book are two of my favorites. How could you not like a general store that sells statues of a hog (ya hafta read the book)? But of all the John Nichols books, The Voice of the Butterfly is my favorite. Perhaps I will someday be an aging ‘60’s radical trying to save a miniscule square of land containing a rare butterfly. If so, I hope I run into as many eccentric characters as populates this [...]

    • Libby says:

      I love the Milagro Beanfield War - which is why I happened to pick up this more recent John Nichols' novel (copyright 2001) when I saw it at the bookstore.I'm not certain if you can truly appreciate Nichols unless you been through New Mexico. It is a unique State with a character all its own that has inspired many artists over time. I believe Nichols' writing accurately captures all that is New Mexico, its history, its people, its beauty and passion, not to mention its craziness. The Voice of th [...]

    • Kate says:

      Hilarious, irreverent and pertinent social and political satire. Big business and greed pitted against activism and idealism. Charley Macfarland, ageing 60s radical with a history of advocating lost causes, and his Butterfly Coalition seek to topple Proposition X in a Suicide City local eletion. Proposition X is all about a few rich greedy people getting wealthier by means of a new highway by-pass which would destroy the mating ground of the Phistic Copper, a rare and (perhaps) endangered specie [...]

    • James Heald says:

      I enjoyed reading this book, but if you aren't a big Nichols fan, a staunch environmentalist, or a leftist political junkie you probably won't get past the first chapter. The book has it's charm and lots of humor, but the characters are all more caricatures of people than fully rounded or even reasonably rounded characters. They are generally either good hearted, but bumbling folks or slimy evil developers, or clueless, self absorbed yuppies. In tone and subject matter, the book is most closely [...]

    • Julie Klett says:

      Blech. I really did not like this book. Unlikeable, unrealistic characters (even all their names were absurd, but not in a funny or entertaining way), and his descriptions of women were always derogatory (to be fair, the men were pretty awful too, but he described the female characters in particularly sexist ways -- they are mammary glands, man, get over it). The story seemed to go on forever without any purpose. I did not find it funny at all -- just not my style. I did not even finish it, and [...]

    • Jonathan Geurts says:

      I was first introduced to John Nichols through what became his classic work, The Milagro Beanfield War. In the Voice, Nichols again captures a distinctly local voice but here protagonizes the most profane characters imaginable. I could not imagine myself venerating anyone in this book, especially not those who most match my own description. Then, surprisingly, I did. It is, simply, satire--scathing, dirty, noble satire.

    • Paul Strohm says:

      I loved the "Milagro Beanfield War" and in fact, the entire trilogy, but I felt "The Voice of the Butterfly" was lazy.The beauty of "The Milagro Beanfield War" was that the reader could relate to the characters -- what they faced and did -- as funny and unique as they were. Don't get me wrong. I still think Mr. Nichols is worth a read, always. But, satire can be taken too far, and I believe this is a prime example.He's better than this. We've seen it!

    • Ruth Conrad says:

      I liked John Nichols' New Mexico Trilogy immensely. Although this novel is somewhat different, it contains the same energy and ideals. The plot involves a conflict between highway builders and butterfly habitat protectors. Nichols' writing is totally zany, but that just supports the craziness of mainstream American culture. I really liked the last chapter, where some profound and hopeful connections occur.

    • Adam Caus says:

      Definitely loved the book - the author's style is great and it was fantastic and unique story to say the least. I am looking forward to reading more by John Nichols!

    • Melissa says:

      nichols is always fairly intense, enthusiastic and sometimes too descriptive. lessons to be learned, lessons to run away from screaming

    • David Roberts says:

      Funny, flip, short, outrageous. Nichols seems to ripen in his later years and is a bit more tart AND sweet

    • Mercurymouth says:

      John Nichols is entertainingke TC Boyle.

    • Victoria says:

      Entertainingly hilarious to read, but incredibly offensive in his descriptions of women, so it cancelled out all the good stuff he was supposedly preaching.

    • Lianna says:

      zany

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