Remake

Remake What happens when you try to find not only meaning but pattern and form in seventy years of a life It s not a simple process of chronological remembering It entails a Remake to capture not facts but

  • Title: Remake
  • Author: Christine Brooke-Rose
  • ISBN: 9781857542226
  • Page: 265
  • Format: Paperback
  • What happens when you try to find not only meaning but pattern and form in seventy years of a life It s not a simple process of chronological remembering It entails a Remake, to capture not facts but the contents of those facts, the feelings of a war time child, the textures of her clothing, the tastes and smells, the tones and the touch of her mother, the felt absence oWhat happens when you try to find not only meaning but pattern and form in seventy years of a life It s not a simple process of chronological remembering It entails a Remake, to capture not facts but the contents of those facts, the feelings of a war time child, the textures of her clothing, the tastes and smells, the tones and the touch of her mother, the felt absence of her father, and the gradual transformation into womanhood The facts are simple birth in Geneva bilingual childhood in Brussels, then London and Liverpool work in Intelligence at the Bletchley Park decoding centre during the war marriage Oxford London literary journalism the emergence of the novelist But what do facts add up to Remake is an autobiographical novel with a difference It uses life material to compose a third person fiction, transformed in an experiment whose tensions are those of memory distorting and partial checked by a rigorous and sceptical language which probes and finds form underlying the wayward impulses and passions of the subject Remake is a fascinating and original book by one of our finest modern novelists.

    423 Comment

    • Scribble Orca says:

      "Bifografy is always part fiction, John* continues. First in the singulative birth, then in the iterative background, then in the singulative splits. Inchoherent inchoative, incognitially punctuated. A situation, an event, another situation. Hero meets donor, is tested, receives a magical auxiliary, brains for instance, is translocated to fight this or that dragon and returns incognition to perform another impossible task like emptying a river with a sieve, for recognition, then the whole cycle [...]

    • MJ Nicholls says:

      Remake is a canny künstlerroman written with CB-R’s usual pronounsense and experimental élan. Narrated by the Old Lady from her retirement, and filtered through various text-twitterers named John, CB-R is Tess in this tale, and the action scopes largely on her childhood and wartime experiences, speeding through her flourishing as an academic and novelist, honing on the hardships. Apart from the moving third chapter PRO-NOUNS about her mother-the-nun’s death in a convent, the story uses a t [...]

    • Stephen P says:

      A 70 year old woman, a fiction though some biographical facts are in line with CBR, looks back on life through a fictional character named Tess, written by Christine Brooke-Rose and read by a reader, both who also are fictional accounts. In this, "Bifografy" it is made clear that any biography must be a fiction comprised of fictional pieces glued and mortared together to create a convincing whole but in the end a betrayal. The subject, as with any friend or otherwise we claim to know must be a b [...]

    • Nick says:

      Top 5 CB-R status cemented. If you're looking for CB-Rs worth your time, do NOT skip this one. Astonishing accomplishment.

    • Jonathan says:

      A proper review to come hopefully tomorrow. But, for now, I will simply say this is a masterpiece - not just in the construction of its many marvellous sentences, but in the rigorous honesty and self-criticism with which she remakes her past."Facts are meaningless, unless reconstructed by experience. Reconned. [] Or remakes of old records, putting in the cracks of verisimilitude. Isn’t life a story? No. A story is arranged. Life is a file. A lot of files, mostly erased, the diskette to be copi [...]

    • Jonathan Norton says:

      CBR's novelistic autobiography of 1996, recreating her life as "Theresa Blair-Hayley", and brekign off to debate directorial points with "John", an authorial device engaged in debate with "the old lady" who is constructing Tess' life.The first surprise is to realise that all those potted biographies that go "born in Geneva, educated at Oxford" conceal a background of genteel poverty, of only just being on the border of the respectable set. Mummy had to take her 2 girls back to living in Britain [...]

    • Antonomasia says:

      Margaret Drabble, in her introduction to the British edition of Thoughts of Sorts by Georges Perec, has this to say about CBR, who was a friend of hers. I thought the increasing number of CBR fans on GR might be interested.(The text is Drabble's but I'm happy for someone to paste my transcription to a more appropriate thread if they like.)Geneva-born Christine Brooke-Rose (b.1923) was certainly highly conscious of the [OuLiPo] group's presence; she is bilingual, lived and taught for many years i [...]

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