The Appalachian Trail Reader

The Appalachian Trail Reader The longest continuously marked footpath in the world the Appalachian Trail spans miles across fourteen states from Georgia to Maine and travels through vastly different natural and social envi

  • Title: The Appalachian Trail Reader
  • Author: David Emblidge
  • ISBN: 9780195100907
  • Page: 139
  • Format: Paperback
  • The longest continuously marked footpath in the world, the Appalachian Trail spans 2,140 miles across fourteen states from Georgia to Maine and travels through vastly different natural and social environments Now, in a lively and eye opening introduction to this national treasure, The Appalachian Trail Reader collects trail diaries, historical and personal essays, and pThe longest continuously marked footpath in the world, the Appalachian Trail spans 2,140 miles across fourteen states from Georgia to Maine and travels through vastly different natural and social environments Now, in a lively and eye opening introduction to this national treasure, The Appalachian Trail Reader collects trail diaries, historical and personal essays, and poems that reflect the meaning of this great wilderness trail across both time and geography Here are the works of both well known writers and anonymous raconteurs, including Henry David Thoreau, James Dickey, Aldo Leopold, James MacGregor Burns, Richard Wilbur, and many others The trail s founding fathers Benton MacKaye and Myron Avery speak here, too, about their visions and plans, while excerpts from Appalachian Trail hikers journals, from the 1930s to the 1990s, provide a firsthand, intimate portrait of walking the trail And throughout, scientists close observation of the natural world mingle with poet s evocations of the sweetness or the rigors of the wilderness experience A patchwork quilt of voices, both eloquent and raw, The Appalachian Trail Reader presents a rich introduction to the trail for those planning a walking trip, and a vivid scrapbook for those who have already hiked its mountains or valleys.

    109 Comment

    • Kristofer Petersen-Overton says:

      A superb anthology! Emblidge weaves the work of historians, folklorists, hikers, essayists, and poets together in this ode to the Appalachian trail. It includes everything from reflections on the changing role of the backpack to the Cherokee legend of "Spearfinger" (a witch who apparently still haunts North Carolina's Whiteside Mountain) to the historic injustice perpetrated against Appalachian communities forced from their lands by the federal government to make way for the AT. It also contains [...]

    • Sandra Larkin says:

      Heaven knows I am not an athletic person but I can walk and maybe with a little conditioning even hike. Having read Bill Bryson's book on the Appalachian Trail, I recently took my own short walk in the woods on the AT at Gathland State Park and Harpers Ferry and became hooked! I set out to learn more and came across this excellent collection of trail diaries, historical and personal essays, and poems that reflect the meaning of this great wilderness trail. Fortunately for me, the Appalachian Tra [...]

    • Nathanael says:

      Like any anthology, this one had its good parts and it's rough patches. The best parts were highlights of people's self published and unpublished trail hiking memoirs. A thing as big as the AT attracts a huge assortment of people looking for and experiencing a huge assortment of purposes.And some of the histories were excellent. The Smokies are empty because we drove the people out, first the natives and then the mountain poor. New Hampshires first mountain dwellers almost immediately turned to [...]

    • Beth Feener says:

      I loved the book. I am driven more toward my goal to thru hike the trail.I enjoyed the personal logs from hikers. I especially would have loved to meet Grandma Gatewood.The historic parts included as we "hiked" through the book really made me love the value of this wonderful man made trail through the woods.The Walt Whitman's, "Song of the Open Road" piece was my favoriteI read it over a dozen times.

    • Kathleen Seal says:

      A nice collection of AT essays from prominent scholars of the trail. Particularly good for information on the trail's early development and purpose. Some redundancy if you are already well versed on the trail. A nice reference book.

    • Markus says:

      A Must read if you are infatuated with the AT : )

    • Margaret says:

      A compilation of stories about theAppalachian Trail, some from hikers, others more technical. Some are wonderful and some are as dry as un-buttered toast. Got a nice book-list out of it.

    • Denise says:

      never fully got through it, skipped around alot, only some stories held my interest

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *