Walkin' with the Ghost Whisperers

Walkin with the Ghost Whisperers The grand old father of the Appalachian Trail Benton MacKaye challenged the nimble footed sojourners who sought the solitude of the Appalachians to see and to see what you see Doubletalk Not on you

  • Title: Walkin' with the Ghost Whisperers
  • Author: Junius R. Tate
  • ISBN: 9781599263779
  • Page: 485
  • Format: Paperback
  • The grand old father of the Appalachian Trail, Benton MacKaye, challenged the nimble footed sojourners who sought the solitude of the Appalachians to see, and to see what you see Doubletalk Not on your life After three thru hikes of the Appalachian Trail, I came face to face with the dismal conclusion that I really had no clue as to what the great man meant True, IThe grand old father of the Appalachian Trail, Benton MacKaye, challenged the nimble footed sojourners who sought the solitude of the Appalachians to see, and to see what you see Doubletalk Not on your life After three thru hikes of the Appalachian Trail, I came face to face with the dismal conclusion that I really had no clue as to what the great man meant True, I had seen, but I had miserably failed to rise to the second part of Mr MacKaye s challenge Belatedly, I discovered that I d done the miles and had the smiles, but the real meat of the trip remained in the grip of the mountains, firmly locked in a time vault to which I had no key But there is another side of the coin Consider the thru hiker s curse Grind out the harsh, unforgiving miles day by day, state by state, with Mount Katahdin s mid October closing deadline always hovering in the near consciousness like a voracious beast What else can one expect Most often the hiker pauses, casually remarks, Hmmm.I wonder what that s all about and continues on Occasionally, a sparse entry is made in a dirt smeared journal Check this out when I get home It seldom if ever happens The real world quickly grips the jubilant thru hiker Dang I did it I m a 2000 miler in a mental vise that soon squeezes all motivation to pursue those little innocent journal entries into gooey mush Over time, good intentions fade and all that s left are the miles and smiles and a guilt gilded vacuum that bespeaks of something missing Walkin4 with the Ghost Whisperers lets the reader step across the threshold of history and walk with the men and women of yesteryear, whose lives impacted on the mountains through which theTrail goes It s all here Native American history that crisscrossed the Trail and the myths that birthed legends which flame the imaginatione pioneers who tested the waters and paved the way for future generations of hikers.horrific Civil War battles that were fought where hikers now trod, their boots scuffing ground consecrated by blood and indomitable willosts that refuse to stay buried.Mary the Elephant whose demise sullied a towne good, the bad, and the ugly And much Whether the reader hungers for a platter of historical entertainment or seeks to nourish the miles and smiles from a previous hike, Walkin4 with the Ghost Whisperers is the book Both trails lead to the same destination To see, and to see what you see Author s Note Benton MacKaye was a remarkable man His beyond the horizon vision of a footpath stretching along the high crests of America s Blue Ridge eventually became reality when the Appalachian Trail opened to foot travel only in 1937 He admonished those who wound their way over peaks and valleys heretofore accessible only to the most hardy and daring to e, and to see what you have seen Well, when I first read these words, they made about as much sense as dribbling mustard on a jelly doughnut If you saw something, you just saw it Period What an idiot I was On a fine summer day in 1998, on my third thru hike, I stopped at a spring in a pretty little glade to air my aching hoofers Pennsylvania rocks are murder, you know While I sat there guzzling cold sweet water, my eyes strayed to a nearby aged stone marker Its sparse wording let me know that my gratification came from Pilger Ruh Spring, where Count Zinzen something or otherand one Conrad Weiser had also quenched their thirst in 1742 Model T, my pesky alter ego, whose sole mission in life is to make mine miserable, piped up, Hey Diddlebrain, what s a Pilger Ruh Damned if I knew, but I wasn t about to let him or it I ve never gotten a handle on our weird relationship have the satisfaction of calling me an ignoramus Well Mr Stupid, if you knew anything at all, you d know it s a German term meaning place to cool your beer And that s when the realization suddenly penetrated my Kentucky tow headed c

    257 Comment

    • Kurt says:

      As an Appalachian Trail junkie, I did like this book. It's not the usual "here's what happened when I hiked the Trail" narrative. Tate's hikes are only the skeleton of the book. The meat on the bones is a series of stories he has collected about the communities, the history, the characters of the regions through which the Trail goes.Good stories, most of them. Mostly interesting in their own right.

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