Making Tea, Making Japan: Cultural Nationalism in Practice

Making Tea Making Japan Cultural Nationalism in Practice The tea ceremony persists as one of the most evocative symbols of Japan Originally a pastime of elite warriors in premodern society it was later recast as an emblem of the modern Japanese state only

  • Title: Making Tea, Making Japan: Cultural Nationalism in Practice
  • Author: Kristin Surak
  • ISBN: 9780804778671
  • Page: 470
  • Format: Paperback
  • The tea ceremony persists as one of the most evocative symbols of Japan Originally a pastime of elite warriors in premodern society, it was later recast as an emblem of the modern Japanese state, only to be transformed again into its current incarnation, largely the hobby of middle class housewives How does the cultural practice of a few come to represent a nation as a wThe tea ceremony persists as one of the most evocative symbols of Japan Originally a pastime of elite warriors in premodern society, it was later recast as an emblem of the modern Japanese state, only to be transformed again into its current incarnation, largely the hobby of middle class housewives How does the cultural practice of a few come to represent a nation as a whole Although few non Japanese scholars have peered behind the walls of a tea room, sociologist Kristin Surak came to know the inner workings of the tea world over the course of ten years of tea training Here she offers the first comprehensive analysis of the practice that includes new material on its historical changes, a detailed excavation of its institutional organization, and a careful examination of what she terms nation work the labor that connects the national meanings of a cultural practice and the actual experience and enactment of it She concludes by placing tea ceremony in comparative perspective, drawing on other expressions of nation work, such as gymnastics and music, in Europe and Asia.Taking readers on a rare journey into the elusive world of tea ceremony, Surak offers an insightful account of the fundamental processes of modernity the work of making nations.

    738 Comment

    • Hadrian says:

      This is about the elaborate Japanese tea ceremony, also tellingly called the Way of Tea (茶の湯). It takes some thirty pages to sketch out the actual process with affectionate detail, which is often differentiated from, yet an integral part of life. There are a few basic elements, but a multitude of precise and integral parts of the ceremony. Everything from the placement of the guests to how to turn your wrist when pouring tea (don't). The following chapters describe the history of the tea c [...]

    • Ietrio says:

      I loved this book that takes away the new age alchemic mysticism that builds up in tea rooms everywhere around the Western World.

    • Nicole Martin says:

      Scholarly so it's a bit dry in places but interesting reading for anyone interested in Japanese tea culture.

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