School Education: Developing A Curriculum

School Education Developing A Curriculum School Education the third volume of Charlotte Mason s Homeschooling Series consists of thoughts about the teaching and curriculum of children aged either at school or at home She suggests th

  • Title: School Education: Developing A Curriculum
  • Author: Charlotte M. Mason
  • ISBN: 9780842313575
  • Page: 437
  • Format: Paperback
  • School Education , the third volume of Charlotte Mason s Homeschooling Series, consists of thoughts about the teaching and curriculum of children aged 9 12, either at school or at home She suggests that parents should practice what she calls masterly inactivity not neglectful or permissive parenting, but simply allowing children to work things out for themselves, do thiSchool Education , the third volume of Charlotte Mason s Homeschooling Series, consists of thoughts about the teaching and curriculum of children aged 9 12, either at school or at home She suggests that parents should practice what she calls masterly inactivity not neglectful or permissive parenting, but simply allowing children to work things out for themselves, do things for themselves, learn from their own mistakes, and to have time for free play, and space for spontaneity Charlotte Mason education uses living books instead of dry textbooks in this book, she discusses what kinds of books to look for in each subject, and how to use them to teach children to love knowledge and become real readers and lifelong learners Charlotte Mason was a late nineteenth century British educator whose ideas were far ahead of her time She believed that children are born persons worthy of respect, rather than blank slates, and that it was better to feed their growing minds with living literature and vital ideas and knowledge, rather than dry facts and knowledge filtered and pre digested by the teacher Her method of education, still used by some private schools and many homeschooling families, is gentle and flexible, especially with younger children, and includes first hand exposure to great and noble ideas through books in each school subject, conveying wonder and arousing curiosity, and through reflection upon great art, music, and poetry nature observation as the primary means of early science teaching use of manipulatives and real life application to understand mathematical concepts and learning to reason, rather than rote memorization and working endless sums and an emphasis on character and on cultivating and maintaining good personal habits Schooling is teacher directed, not child led, but school time should be short enough to allow students free time to play and to pursue their own worthy interests such as handicrafts Traditional Charlotte Mason schooling is firmly based on Christianity, although the method is also used successfully by secular families and families of other religions.

    425 Comment

    • Angie Libert says:

      Charlotte Mason is simply brilliant. I would give this book 15 stars, for each of the three times I have read this, if that were an option.

    • Ardyth says:

      The middle of this was a tougher slog than volumes one and two, but the appendices more than made up for it! The sample exam questions & children's responses, plus specific oral lessons, are exactly what I needed to see at this point. Possibly my favorite in the series thus far.

    • Kristyn says:

      This volume clarifies the concepts of "education is the science of relations" and masterly inactivity, among other things.The appendices provide a lot of practical information as far as school subjects and time tables. The sample examination answers from "average students" are remarkable.

    • Shannen says:

      Most of this book was really hard to get through. If you're looking for info that directly effects your homeschool, skip to chapter 15. All that's before that is a lot of information of educational theories of the 19th and early 20th century.

    • Deanna says:

      I thoroughly enjoy this series. I wish I would have read it years ago. Better late then never. Here are some favorite quotes:Children need a good deal of letting alone.The effort of decision is the greatest effort of life.We know that 'one custom overcometh another,' and that one idea supplant another. We do not give up a child to be selfish, or greedy, or lazy.Children have no natural appetite for twaddle, and special literature for children is probably far less necessary that the booksellers [...]

    • Catherine Gillespie says:

      Whereas the first time I read the book I think I read it with an eye toward how habits impact character and lay groundwork, now I have a better perspective on how habits can really help the routine of school and life to run more smoothly.I say that because although I’ve continued to focus on habits as character training, I have failed to focus on them as a means to smooth our days and make school easier on us all.Read my full review here

    • SuzanneG says:

      Meredith referred me to a spot in here a couple weeks ago, and I've been skipping around and enjoying a lot in here. Have only read Vol. 1 and 6d this one is a bit more "fun" and I haven't figured out why.

    • Rochelle Brown says:

      Charlotte Mason was an outstanding educator. It is to our shame that our teachers do not use her methods today. Much would be improved in our country if we did.

    • Sally Ewan says:

      This is an excellent encouragement to me as I work on next year's school plans. Miss Mason's methods contain so much wisdom!

    • Mackenzie says:

      Oh, Charlotte Mason. You complete me my educational philosophy.

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