The Dog Farm

The Dog Farm For thousands of young Westerners South Korea is an escape from reality It is a place where money is easy and booze is cheap By day they toil in crooked cram schools teaching the peninsula s violent

  • Title: The Dog Farm
  • Author: David S. Wills
  • ISBN: 9780956952516
  • Page: 412
  • Format: Paperback
  • For thousands of young Westerners, South Korea is an escape from reality It is a place where money is easy and booze is cheap By day they toil in crooked cram schools, teaching the peninsula s violent, video game obsessed youth At night they cut loose and embrace Korea s famous drinking culture Among these disaffected young teachers is Alexander Young, naive and a litFor thousands of young Westerners, South Korea is an escape from reality It is a place where money is easy and booze is cheap By day they toil in crooked cram schools, teaching the peninsula s violent, video game obsessed youth At night they cut loose and embrace Korea s famous drinking culture Among these disaffected young teachers is Alexander Young, naive and a little drunker than most, he is struggling to cope with life on the wrong side of the world In The Dog Farm we follow Alex from girl to girl, beer to beer, across Korea, to Japan, and back again, in an unlikely love story The heartfelt cavorting of Jack Kerouac across America is recalled in The Dog Farm 10 Magazine Hunter S Thompson would ve been proud The Dog Farm is much like a gin and tonic a bit too bitter for some and just what the doctor ordered for others Chris in South Korea Wills text remains an entertaining novel throughout, particularly for readers with experience living and or working in South Korea Alexander s descriptions of day to day life for an expat in Korea will ring true to moments we have all experienced I found the novel triggering memories that left me nodding in agreement In addition, Wills prose is fluid and easy to read a great achievement for his first piece of long form fiction I will certainly be seeking out his future work Daegu Compass

    665 Comment

    • David says:

      Call me biased but this book is the shit.

    • Chris Backe says:

      Hunter S. Thompson would've been proud.Full disclosure: I received a review copy ahead of publication, and this review has also been published on my blog, chrisinsouthkoreaForget what you know about Korea. Forget what you know about teaching English. Forget the screaming five-year-olds and impossible bosses screaming Korean obscenities. This is one part sex, one part drugs, and one part a search for rock-and-roll in the land of K-pop. Did I mention it's a book?The Dog Farm starts as any possibly [...]

    • Steven P. says:

      Fairly accurate depiction of the waekook life. Very well composed book.

    • Seth says:

      I feel the need to defend this book from those calling it racist; truth is, I would have a similar response to a culture as hostile as the narrator describes.But I'm just not up to the task. Why? This book is unbearably shallow. The protagonist's (if we can call him that) attempts at emotion are always infantile at best, and downright embarrassing to read the rest of the time. I know it's bad form to draw the author into a criticism of a book, but when the author's day job is writing/editing for [...]

    • John Mensing says:

      On the Plane The heartful cavorting of Jack Kerouac across America is recalled in The Dog Farm, a first novel by blogger David S. Willis. The title comes from a very vivid encounter with a boshintang restaurant, where dog meat soup is served. Although it often reads like a blog – the protagonist, Alexander, writes in the first person and often seems to be Willis himself – the novelist’s touch is there as well, tracing a story arc from Scotland to Korea and back again. We find in Alex’s [...]

    • Carlos Hughes says:

      This is a book that got unfairly slated in my opinion, I found Wills' tale of Alexander, a Scots expat who jumps between South Korea to Japan and back to South Korea a very engaging read. You can tell he borrows his influences from the 'Beat Generation' of writers, I don't think that is a bad thing at all, if the Beat Generation had been millenials, I am sure one if not them all would have given teaching English in Asia a go and got up to what Alexander did in his book.It loses a star because it [...]

    • Tasha Swinney says:

      The hilarious thing about The Dog Farm is that the protagonist spends so much time complaining about obvious English errors he finds in Korea, and yet, the book contains grammatical problems. Anyhow, I'm not going to waste my time giving this book a bad review, since Wills obviously didn't want to waste his time trying to write a decent book.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *